How do people with hearing loss mix the treble in their songs? - diyAudio
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Old 20th October 2009, 03:05 AM   #1
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Default How do people with hearing loss mix the treble in their songs?

So, many artists seem to play with their music/instruments/sounds, etc. up loud, and would lose their HF hearing ability. How do they still manage to mix all the HF stuff in while still maintaining a decent sound?

Can they really just rely on someone else who can still hear the HF's or a frequency response graph?
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Old 20th October 2009, 03:28 AM   #2
Glowbug is offline Glowbug  United States
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How do they still manage to mix all the HF stuff in while still maintaining a decent sound?
Trust the engineers
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Old 20th October 2009, 04:16 AM   #3
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IMO It is like getting used to the sound of your mix monitors, you get used to the sound of your own ears.
Using your experience recording and mixing, knowing your equipment along with opionons of people you trust.
It's a matter of comparing your recordings to other recordings for overall balance. Then you can try cupping your hands over your ears to increase the sensitivity to higher frequencies. Also using spectrum analysers can help.
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Old 24th October 2009, 04:03 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Glowbug View Post
Trust the engineers
By the sound of some modern productions, that's not always a good idea.
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Old 16th November 2009, 06:04 AM   #5
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By the sound of some modern productions, that's not always a good idea.
It usually isn't the engineer's fault.
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Old 17th November 2009, 12:34 PM   #6
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Quote:
It usually isn't the engineer's fault.
so true....

you don't know how many times i had to destroy a perfect mix because the artist thought the vocal are not loud enough or some other B S .....

i'm a rock bass player and sound engineer.
you can imagine my HF hearing ability is not like it used to be

the thing is, i know my monitors so well, i know how the whole complex of the mix should sound like.
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