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Old 14th January 2003, 04:11 PM   #1
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Default Speaker Impedance

Are speaker loads more inductive or conductive? Also, is there much reactive power loss across a speakers load? In other words are the voltage and current in phase?
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Old 14th January 2003, 07:03 PM   #2
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The impedance of most speaker systems (and their filters) vary from inductive through resistive to capacitive and many combinations thereof with frequency.
So the answer to this question would be : all of the above..

All power losses are resistive. If there was a pure capacitance or inductance, there would be conversion of energy to an electromagnetic (inductor) or electrostatic (capacitor) field and vice versa, in other words you would have an oscillatory system.

If you say "in other words, are volt & current in phase" you are really adressing another topic altogether. My first para above implies that except for the freq where the impedance is purely resistive, the answer is no.

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Old 14th January 2003, 07:55 PM   #3
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Quote:
If there was a pure capacitance or inductance, there would be conversion of energy to an electromagnetic (inductor) or electrostatic (capacitor) field and vice versa, in other words you would have an oscillatory system.
Just to clarify, the oscillatory system would only exist if there were both capacitance and inductance in the circuit, correct?. If there were only one of the two then there would always be a complex power loss in the circuit, no matter the frequency.

You said that at certain frequencies the load is more inductive or capacitive. If a constant frequency signal was sent through the load then wouldn't there be a reactive power loss? (except for the frequency that "balances" the inductive and capacitve loads).

Quote:
If you say "in other words, are volt & current in phase" you are really adressing another topic altogether.
Could you elaborate, I thought that the phase relationship of current to voltage was directly related to complex power loss.
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