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Old 11th December 2006, 08:10 PM   #1
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Default tang band full range line array, thoughts?

Okay,

I have done alot of searching and have seen some people do this, and others not. I would like to build a pair of 9 speaker line array using 3" full range tang band drivers. either the w3-871 or the w3-926 speakers. Being this is a near field only. This would be the front channels of a home theatre, and probably will be a ghosted center channel across the two channels.

What is everybodys thoughts?

I have read that you get combing, but im not really sure what combing means exactly. also, if I put a tweeter or tweeter array in, would that eliminate the combing of full range drivers?
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Old 11th December 2006, 09:52 PM   #2
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These definitions were taken from the PE site:

Comb Filtering: An artifact seen in multi-driver systems that is the result of constructive and destructive interference from multiple point sources. The addition or subtraction of multiple sources will vary with location relative to the speaker. Comb filtering becomes more of a concern at higher frequencies due to the shorter wavelengths involved. Most often used when talking about line arrays where spacing between tweeters can be problematic.

and:

Lobing: The three-dimensional shape of how sound radiates from a multiple-point-source speaker. The sound will vary with different angles relative to the listening axis due to the separation of the acoustic centers. At some angles, there will be cancellations at certain frequencies. Lobing occurs vertically in vertically aligned speakers and horizontally in horizontally aligned speakers.

Not trying to dampen the spirits but I am concerned when I hear line array and near field used in the same sentence. The only luck I have had listening to line arrays is when you are farfield. Too close and you run into the above definitions.
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Old 11th December 2006, 10:14 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cal Weldon
These definitions were taken from the PE site:

Comb Filtering: An artifact seen in multi-driver systems that is the result of constructive and destructive interference from multiple point sources. The addition or subtraction of multiple sources will vary with location relative to the speaker. Comb filtering becomes more of a concern at higher frequencies due to the shorter wavelengths involved. Most often used when talking about line arrays where spacing between tweeters can be problematic.

and:

Lobing: The three-dimensional shape of how sound radiates from a multiple-point-source speaker. The sound will vary with different angles relative to the listening axis due to the separation of the acoustic centers. At some angles, there will be cancellations at certain frequencies. Lobing occurs vertically in vertically aligned speakers and horizontally in horizontally aligned speakers.

Not trying to dampen the spirits but I am concerned when I hear line array and near field used in the same sentence. The only luck I have had listening to line arrays is when you are farfield. Too close and you run into the above definitions.
understood, I would rather you dampen my spirits then me spend all the time and effort to build the arrays only to not be satisified with the results.

alot of the research I did basically pointed to the fact that a line array of full range drivers is not worth it. However, the Jordan line array seems to have positive results, but the little bit of reading i did on that driver it seems that it's results were favorable because the driver was designed for it, and that it had its dispersion wave more horizontal then vertical (if I understood what i was reading anyway)
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Old 11th December 2006, 10:19 PM   #4
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I think it boils down to this: If you don't need the extra power handling of a line array then a single driver will give you what you need. If you take the monies for nine of the TB's you might find you are happier with one really good driver or one driver and a tweeter. Line arrays sound like fun and can be dazzling to the eyes but in the end, your eyes can't listen.

Do you have a woofer already?
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Old 11th December 2006, 10:24 PM   #5
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Default Near Field Line Array White Paper

For line array design perhaps you should read my white paper which is:

http://www.audiodiycentral.com/resource/pdf/nflawp.pdf

A properly designed Near Field Line Array is very nice sounding.

But as you will find from my white paper that I am not a big fan of a single line array of full range drivers. A single line array as you suggest would need equalization to account for the high end roll off as even then it would be the best of sound. You'll need to add a tweeter line for best results.

Jim
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Old 12th December 2006, 03:15 PM   #6
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Default Re: Near Field Line Array White Paper

Quote:
Originally posted by Jim Griffin
For line array design perhaps you should read my white paper which is:

http://www.audiodiycentral.com/resource/pdf/nflawp.pdf

A properly designed Near Field Line Array is very nice sounding.

But as you will find from my white paper that I am not a big fan of a single line array of full range drivers. A single line array as you suggest would need equalization to account for the high end roll off as even then it would be the best of sound. You'll need to add a tweeter line for best results.

Jim

Jim, I did read your white paper and it was very helpful, In the end I don't think a line array will work like I was hoping.
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Old 30th June 2012, 09:18 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Griffin View Post
For line array design perhaps you should read my white paper which is:

DIY Home Audio, DIY Car Audio, DIY iPod Integration, and Do It Yourself Whole House Audio

A properly designed Near Field Line Array is very nice sounding.

But as you will find from my white paper that I am not a big fan of a single line array of full range drivers. A single line array as you suggest would need equalization to account for the high end roll off as even then it would be the best of sound. You'll need to add a tweeter line for best results.

Jim
I don't understand where do I get the white paper?
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Old 30th June 2012, 10:23 AM   #8
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Not there any more obviously; note that the last post in this thread was almost 6 years ago, so things change. Here you are: http://www.diy-audio.narod.ru/litr/nflawp.pdf
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Old 30th June 2012, 10:24 AM   #9
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Damn sorry I didn't know I revived this thread just found it on a search with google! Didn't even think about looking at how old it is! Thanks anyway!
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Old 30th June 2012, 10:31 AM   #10
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Not a problem. The link I provided is up to date (as of today anyway ); it's a good read.

I wouldn't entirely write off arrays based around small wideband drivers though -they can & do work, but like anything else, the results depend on how well they're designed & implemented. It's not usually quite as simple as sticking a dozen ~3 1/2in FR units or so in a vertical line & hoping for the best. Alas.

Last edited by Scottmoose; 30th June 2012 at 10:36 AM.
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