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Old 14th May 2006, 05:23 PM   #21
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That's a big improvement, nice one. I guess on speakers that size it's OK doing it by hand. Wouldn't fancy it on a big pair though!

Did you sand much or would you say it's the car polisher and cutting compound that's made the difference?
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Old 14th May 2006, 05:49 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally posted by richie00boy
That's a big improvement, nice one. I guess on speakers that size it's OK doing it by hand. Wouldn't fancy it on a big pair though!

Did you sand much or would you say it's the car polisher and cutting compound that's made the difference?
I'd be interested to hear about this too. I tried what I think Vikash is describing with the paints I use but it didn't come up very good and had a smoothed out faint orange peel type reflection. I could only really get decent results using sanding and then rubbing compound, wax etc. Its likely that 2k stuff dries harder and more quickly making it tougher on the rubbing compound alone. However, it would appear the paint Vikash is using allows more freedom with finishing.
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Old 14th May 2006, 07:12 PM   #23
Vikash is offline Vikash  United Kingdom
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I found that the cutting compound I had needs to be applied by a powered polisher to be effective. It's like the consistency of toothpaste. I tried it directly on the orange peel surface in the post 12 pic and it didn't do much even with the polisher.

I got the results in post 30 by flattening as best as I could with 1200 grit (wet) and then using the polisher and compound. Most of the work is defintely in the sanding.

I've been advised to go no less than 1500 grit and then move on to the cutting compound: http://www.paints4u.com/ProductDetai...productID=2789

I'm going to order a palm sander, spray another 5-8 base coats, flat with 1500 grit then polish with the above compound. Hopefully for the final time. Note that my last pic has no clear coat!

In case you've never tried it, I find a silicone car dyring thingy very useful for checking your wet sanding work perdioically: http://www.thepartsbin.com/sitemap/g...ies~parts.html
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Old 14th May 2006, 07:21 PM   #24
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Ah I see now.

Pretty much the same thing I do; sand lightly and then compound with a powered polisher. After this I then simply apply the ultrafine cutting compound and acrylic sealant by hand using the finest quality applicator towels I could find.

If you want less work and a finer finish then use this paper:

http://www.paints4u.com/ProductDetai...?productID=360

http://www.paints4u.com/ProductDetai...productID=6030

I think the finish is even finer if leave it to soak in water overnight.
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Old 14th May 2006, 08:20 PM   #25
Cortez is offline Cortez  Hungary
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Hi Vikash !

Nice work, it looks really fine now !
The only difference between post #12 and #30 is that you
wet-sanded that orange peel surface with an 1200 grit paper
and then you polished it with a rubbing compound ?
Even without clearcoat it looks really shiny, just like a perfect mirror...
Otherwise could you later write a "conlusion" or "summary" post
about the steps, and collect your final experiences and advices ?

Thx and congratulations !
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Old 14th May 2006, 08:50 PM   #26
Vikash is offline Vikash  United Kingdom
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Hi, yes difference between the two pics is just wet sanding with 1200 grit and then polish with cutting paste compound. It's still not perfect but now I understand how most of it works and it's just a matter of tweaking the compounds and grit values used.

I will write up all the details once I've finished, but I also recommend reading the posts beginning here: http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showt...705#post908705
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Old 14th May 2006, 09:33 PM   #27
Vikash is offline Vikash  United Kingdom
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Some more questions for you Shin:

Did you get two nozzles with the spray gun, or is it just available in two? (1.5mm and 1.78mm)

Since we're using the same compressor and gun, would you mind reading the pressure setting on the compressor next time you're out, and also the exact spray width and flow settings on the gun (number of turns perhaps). This would be a big help as I'm not confident I've set things up well. It's a shame you're not located closer...
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Old 14th May 2006, 10:09 PM   #28
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Hi Vikash

I got two nozzle sizes 1.5 and 1.78 with mine, along with a cleaning brush, reducer and a wrench. I only use the 1.78 for primers since they are high viscosity, for the rest I use the 1.5.

I adjust the fan depending upon what coat I'm applying and size of the work. For the primer I use a fairly concentrated fan size of around a 3inches, this is mainly to lay down thick coats. Be sure to hold the gun a little further away from the work(around a foot is good for me) or use quicker movements since its easy to get buildup and runs using these thick passes. If you mess up then it can be fixed later with sanding, try to get it good and even though since it does effect the uniformity of the final and can cause very slight distortions even after you sand away runs.

For the important coats be sure to hold the gun around 6 inches from the work and keep the coats as even as possible and use light dropcoats to ensure good uniformity - this is absolutely critical for metallics since they very easily highlight the spray pattern. I always use the largest spray pattern for clearcoats and metallics. It goes on finer and this is fairly important for these critical coats.

For the pressure settings it depends upon what I'm spraying but to set the pressure press and hold the trigger with an empty gun and then adjust the regulator until it reads whatever you need. Here's what I use; basecoat 1.6bar, primer 1.6 bar and clearcoat is 2 bar.

You'll notice that the pressure will have dropped after using it for a time and just before the compressor kicks back its around 0.3bar below what you originally set it at, so average it out and set it a little higher to compensate - Last thing you need is a big blob of paint shooting out the gun and onto the work because the pressure was insufficient to keep the spray thoroughly atomised.

Hope that helps.
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Old 16th May 2006, 09:04 AM   #29
Vikash is offline Vikash  United Kingdom
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I've been using whichever nozzle is fitted as standard when you get the gun. I didn't notice another in the box, but when I read the website description again the other day it led to me to think I may have another one in there...

Quote:
For the important coats be sure to hold the gun around 6 inches from the work
If I did it at six inches I'd probably blow the work piece away. I obviously need to play with my settings a bit more...

Quote:
Last thing you need is a big blob of paint shooting out the gun and onto the work because the pressure was insufficient
Though my pressure setting appears to be higher, this is the exact problem I had. All the coats went on fine, until the last panel when I got some blobs of paint that ruined it. During sanding they come off and leave spots that requires touching up - which to me means respraying.

How do you touch up? I tried sorting it by dabbing some paint on with a brush which messed things up even more. Hence I'll be sanding it all down again, and putting lots of coats on.

All fun and games hey.
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Old 16th May 2006, 10:48 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally posted by Vikash
I've been using whichever nozzle is fitted as standard when you get the gun. I didn't notice another in the box, but when I read the website description again the other day it led to me to think I may have another one in there...

If I did it at six inches I'd probably blow the work piece away. I obviously need to play with my settings a bit more...

Though my pressure setting appears to be higher, this is the exact problem I had. All the coats went on fine, until the last panel when I got some blobs of paint that ruined it. During sanding they come off and leave spots that requires touching up - which to me means respraying.

How do you touch up? I tried sorting it by dabbing some paint on with a brush which messed things up even more. Hence I'll be sanding it all down again, and putting lots of coats on.

All fun and games hey.
That sounds like moisure or oil from the compressor. Runs of paint will be just be that and won't displace the paint, oil and moisture will though. A coalescent filter will eliminate that or you can bleed the tank before use and then fill the tank up, turn the compressor off and then empty it to shift the bad cr@p out of the tank that's gathered whilst its been idle.
When a compressor is new this also tends to happen, oil from the motor mixes with the air but once the motor gets worn- in this is rare. Also be sure not to move the compressor from one temperature extreme to another and then use it, for example - cold shed and then moved into direct sunlight when spraying. Also be sure that you've not run the compressor hard for a while otherwise your shooting hot air from the gun, again this is a problem with direct drive compressors. The best ones are the medical grade types, these have all the filters required to have air of breathable quality, expensive though.

If you need to touch up with a brush then you must ensure that the paint has fully hardened(1 month+ for 1k) otherwise the fresh paint you apply simply reactivates the existing paint and you just end up rubbing the coats away.
The best method by far is an air brush for small area touch up, I rubbed through a small spot of the laquer on the base of my speakers. All I did was clean the work with panel wipe and then sprayed the affected area using the air brush. It has superb control and virtually zero over spray. After this I carried on as normal and its invisible, just looks like its supposed to.
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