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Old 11th March 2006, 05:53 PM   #1
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Does anyone know of a site that has good beginners information on building your own home speaker system? I have two Sansui PM C100 floor standing speakers that are about 25 years old, rated at 260 watts apiece and 8 ohms. I can get a JVC RX 664 reciever that looks nice to me (though $55 for a college student is still a lot of money) but I don't know what I should be looking for to fit with these speakers. What's the most important thing to look for in a reciever, especially with these older speakers? Do speakers 'age' gracefully?
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Old 11th March 2006, 06:16 PM   #2
T2T is offline T2T  United States
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One of the big problems that you'll find with vintage speakers is that the "surrounds" on the drivers will tend to dry out/rot. However, you can sometimes find kits to "re-foam" the surronds on the speakers to renew them.

As far as where to learn how to build speakers, this place is a good start - as is the Madisound forum as well as the PartsExpress forum.
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Old 11th March 2006, 08:54 PM   #3
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Thats a 7.1 surround sound receiver no?
I guess its hard to find a stereo unit these days at the big box.

If'n it were me, I'd pick up a vintage monster receiver at ebay for 100 bucks or so. Late seventies to early eighties had some nice stuff. I just repaired a "Concept 11.0' receiver, very nice design and build quality. Great tuner and phono stage. Top notch sleeper rig if i say myself. Rated at 110W to 175W 4 ohms. Must weigh close to 40-50 lbs. I imagine 2-3 times heaver than the (100W x 6 outputs) as the one you are considering.
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Old 13th March 2006, 10:43 PM   #4
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"Refoam"? What is that, and how do I know whether I should do it or not?
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Old 13th March 2006, 10:51 PM   #5
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Refoaming means to renew the surrounds. To test, gently depress the surround with your finger. If your finger stops, good, if your fingers goes through, bad, need new surrounds.

Not something to jump into if you've never done it.

If you are considering doing an HT, perhaps you can consider buying kit speakers. Just buy two satellites to start plus a woofer and add the others when the budget allows.
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Old 14th March 2006, 01:09 AM   #6
Ron E is offline Ron E  United States
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Refoaming is very tedious, but not difficult. It is not something to get into if you are not methodical and patient, but otherwise anyone with any mechanical aptitude or skill at making things can do it as long as they don't try to rush things or skip steps.
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Old 14th March 2006, 11:55 PM   #7
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So the best way to use these speakers is to buy a reciever from the same era?

I've also noticed that with a friends reciever that they have a lighter bass. Is that a product of the times, eg is more emphasis put on making bass-y speakers nowadays than the late seventies? I like all kinds of music, and Bad Company sounds really good on the speakers, but a lot of newer stuff sounds a little light.

If that is the case, can anybody recommend a good cheap sub?
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Old 15th March 2006, 12:02 AM   #8
infinia is offline infinia  United States
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No, not really but I think it has a cool vintage theme more or less.
You don't want a fosgate w/a JL sub in a 37 Packard right.
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