resonant frequency of water (distilled) and how to make speaker play underwater - Page 3 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 28th September 2005, 09:18 PM   #21
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NC
Quote:
Originally posted by grataku
Liquified oxygen and hydrogen mixture and reactive surface: that's going to be beautiful. Let me know I'll get the camera ready. (tha't's me wearing welding goggles while waiting)

I guess you didn't understand quickshifts question.

hahah the mixtures would be seperated
or at least I think so..... but I don't even think sound is good solution anyway
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 09:42 PM   #22
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Dallas, TX
Quote:
Originally posted by Audiophilenoob



hahah the mixtures would be seperated
or at least I think so..... but I don't even think sound is good solution anyway
LOL,

Thousands of scientists working on the problem for atleast 20 years and you thought the answer was DIYAUDIO.com and a big speaker amplifier??

I highly recommend you look over at http://www.amasci.com/tesla/tesla.html look over some of his experiments and then try the "Nikola Tesla forum" link for some pretty good reading...

--Chris
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 10:20 PM   #23
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NC
Quote:
Originally posted by DIY_newbie


LOL,

Thousands of scientists working on the problem for at least 20 years and you thought the answer was DIYAUDIO.com and a big speaker amplifier??

I was going to try meyer's idea... not end world hunger

I have access to all the tools needed to make any alloy for free BTW.... just so you know (well over the material costs I suppose to buy the compounds)

scientists are going at it wrong IMO... so I want to try something different... ti's called doing something for fun.... not trying to make a water powered car.... just a small fuel cell idea

laughably this afternoon I came up with LiAlH4 ... then found out a guy figured it out 2 yrs ago... BLAST!!! and some japanese guy is using my idea (ok he had it first but I still thought of it earlier before i read it) of using boron compounds in fuel cells

BLAST...

at least it seems like I'm on the right track... just a couple years behind HAHA... but pat on my back for thinking of them on my own... even though in the end I was years late
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 10:31 PM   #24
SY is offline SY  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
SY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicagoland
Blog Entries: 1
But lithium aluminum hydride is not very inexpensive.
__________________
You might be screaming "No, no, no" and all they hear is "Who wants cake?" Let me tell you something: They all do. They all want cake.- Wilford Brimley
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 10:53 PM   #25
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Dallas, TX
How about pure sodium and water :

2 Na + 2 H2O > 2 NaOH + H2

This is a heavily exothermic reaction so you have to find some way to keep the hydrogen from igniting.. Maybe you could use the heat generated as a power source along with teh hydrogen?

--Chris
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 10:54 PM   #26
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NC
Quote:
Originally posted by SY
But lithium aluminum hydride is not very inexpensive.

true .... usage as a fuel cell isn't what I'm interested in though...

lithium aluminum hydride can be re "hydrated" after expending the hydrogen... but it has a low H content compared to what should be used

I'm more interested in a chemical reaction that releases hydrogen from both water and the alloy itself but can be on the cheap if mass produced and the inert alloy can then be re "hydrated"

a Company called Zenn has made an alloy that releases 30L of hydrogen per minute in salt water for 60hrs before going inert

I'm intrested in something like this... they claim it costs 1/2 a cent per gram if mass produced...

I've come up with a crazy alloy that looks like it will yield two inert compounds when explosed to water... problem is the reaction does not sustain itself and needs a catalyst... but produces around 15% hydrogen by weight from the water and alloy combined

it's interesting but I think the catalyst would combust the hydrogen being expelled.... bah I've only been working 7 days on this..... I'll give myself some more time before I give up
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 10:55 PM   #27
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Dallas, TX
Here is a video of the reaction.

http://www.pc.chemie.uni-siegen.de/p...im/natrium.mpg

You can see the purple color indicator showing that the reaction is producing NaOH and is stable for a few seconds before it self ignites...

--Chris
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 10:57 PM   #28
SY is offline SY  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
SY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicagoland
Blog Entries: 1
Default sodium

As a lab project, sure. And you can get some more heat out of it when you neutralize the sodium hydroxide. As a commercial power source, it's impractical because of the energy it takes to make sodium metal. Even more energetic is sodium/potassium alloy ("nak"), which looks and flows just like mercury at room temp.

Sodium and potassium are very tricky to handle and can/do react explosively with water and water vapor. They should only be handled by experienced chemists.
__________________
You might be screaming "No, no, no" and all they hear is "Who wants cake?" Let me tell you something: They all do. They all want cake.- Wilford Brimley
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 10:58 PM   #29
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NC
Quote:
Originally posted by DIY_newbie
How about pure sodium and water :

2 Na + 2 H2O > 2 NaOH + H2

This is a heavily exothermic reaction so you have to find some way to keep the hydrogen from igniting.. Maybe you could use the heat generated as a power source along with teh hydrogen?

--Chris

it's possible... problem is that sodium expells the gas too quickly and is quite expensive in pure forms.... the idea is to not have much hydrogen storage but when you play the mineral it either lasts a long time for a certain hydrogen yield....

I think you could simply introduce the sodium underwater with no air above it.... I've never see it done and you would have to secure the sodium from rising to the top of the water... I would imagine this would get very hot but probably not ignite the air bubbles of hydrogen

a more complicated double displacement of both the mineral AND water is what I'm interested in... the yields would be higher this way
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2005, 11:02 PM   #30
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NC
Default Re: sodium

Quote:
Originally posted by SY
As a lab project, sure. And you can get some more heat out of it when you neutralize the sodium hydroxide. As a commercial power source, it's impractical because of the energy it takes to make sodium metal. Even more energetic is sodium/potassium alloy ("nak"), which looks and flows just like mercury at room temp.

Sodium and potassium are very tricky to handle and can/do react explosively with water and water vapor. They should only be handled by experienced chemists.
true I'm more looking into maybe something like a HCL acid and a hydride that when combined does double displacement

HCL is very very easy, cheap to get in any quantity, can be produced from very simple things... Heck unless I'm mistaken I believe millions of tons of the acid are produced annually already in the US

an Acid would likely not need catalyst... if the right metal is found that would displace the hydrogen from the compound....

dang this topic got Way off the sound topic... sry everyone
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
speakers operating near their resonant frequency kanguru007 Multi-Way 26 28th March 2009 02:02 PM
Reverse engineering resonant frequency jonkun227 Multi-Way 13 12th April 2007 05:33 PM
What about resonant frequency? Javachip Full Range 6 15th June 2006 06:12 AM
Resonant Frequency of an enclosure AudioFreak Multi-Way 9 4th July 2003 12:30 AM
how can i figure out the resonant frequency of my room? travis Everything Else 9 17th May 2002 06:17 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 07:23 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2