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Old 14th June 2005, 10:52 PM   #31
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sdclc126 and Bill Fitzpatrick:

The last two posts have been sent to Texas. That is the last sniping I wish to see from either of you today. Let's just move on...

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Old 14th June 2005, 11:55 PM   #32
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I love that site. Took a bit to read it and i think that pumice thing is something i would like to try. Not this time but next time. Can i add a slight pigment to the shelac without affecting its drying properties?
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Old 15th June 2005, 12:19 AM   #33
robertG is offline robertG  Canada
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I'm not sure how pigment would react with shellac. One thing for sure, pigment would have to be in powder form.
Shellac is made with alcohol, which is incompatible with both water and oil.

On the other hand, you can test it by preparing a small batch...

Shellac flakes comes in three "flavors": clear (or pale), orange and dark (or red). For frecnh polishing, the pale or clear one is usually used.
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Old 15th June 2005, 12:26 AM   #34
dhenryp is offline dhenryp  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by robertG
I'm not sure how pigment would react with shellac. One thing for sure, pigment would have to be in powder form.
Shellac is made with alcohol, which is incompatible with both water and oil.

On the other hand, you can test it by preparing a small batch...

Shellac flakes comes in three "flavors": clear (or pale), orange and dark (or red). For frecnh polishing, the pale or clear one is usually used.

You can buy alcohol soluble aniline dye. A google will get you many sources.
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Old 15th June 2005, 12:29 AM   #35
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Orange sounds promising then i dont have to screw around and ruin something perfectly acceptable as it is. That would add some colour to this otherwise plain wood.
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Old 15th June 2005, 12:55 AM   #36
cowanrg is offline cowanrg  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by Madmike2
Orange sounds promising then i dont have to screw around and ruin something perfectly acceptable as it is. That would add some colour to this otherwise plain wood.
actually, wood can look awesome once its got some shellac or lacquer on it... my preamp faceplate looked pretty bland before i started working with it. it looked like boring old oak or something, but it came out awesome. proper finishing really brings out the beauty in wood.
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Old 15th June 2005, 01:05 AM   #37
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HMmmmmmmmmm and if i STILL dont like it i can sand it back to plain wood again start fresh. Good call on the au naturel
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Old 15th June 2005, 01:06 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally posted by robertG
alcohol, which is incompatible with both water and oil.
Alcohol is an emulsifier which will mix with both oil and water. That why it's used for gas line antifreeze among other things.

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Old 15th June 2005, 11:59 AM   #39
robertG is offline robertG  Canada
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cal Weldon


Alcohol is an emulsifier which will mix with both oil and water. That why it's used for gas line antifreeze among other things.

Cal

Look, prepared shellac has to be ditched after 6 month because air humidity (as in water) gets into the preparation.

Oil is used to apply the stuff with a rag and won't interfere in any way with shellac, it just accumulate on top of the finish and then can be removed.

Incompatible does not mean it cannot coexist. Hey I'm incompatible with my mother in law...
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Old 15th June 2005, 12:23 PM   #40
Jennice is offline Jennice  Denmark
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Originally posted by robertG
... Hey I'm incompatible with my mother in law...

Seems to be a fairly common phenomenon.
Then again, time tends to solve the co-existence dilemma.

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