paint sand paint sand .... - Page 3 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 9th June 2005, 04:22 PM   #21
dhenryp is offline dhenryp  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Mass.
I forgot to mention that I seal the MDF (the edges in particular) with a 50-50 mix of water and wood glue. Let dry and sand. I also use Bondo to cover dimples, cracks and a host of other sins.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th June 2005, 05:27 PM   #22
hooha is offline hooha  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
hooha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Quote:
Originally posted by Bill Fitzpatrick


When you want to illustrate the finish on an item you need to illuminate and photograph the item at angles which allow the camera to see the defects in the finish. This is facilitated by not allowing any object which may reduce clarity to be reflected from the surface and into the camera lens. If you want comments or suggestions on how to reduce or eliminate the flaws, all those in a position to assist you must be able to see your results. Of course this requires more effort than just picking up the camera and shooting. We dearly want to help but you must put forth some effort as well.

Is that better?

Awesome Bill. Couldn't have said it better myself. I think you can remove your sig now...

Mark
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th June 2005, 06:00 PM   #23
MBK is offline MBK  Singapore
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Singapore
Good suggestions by dhenryp.

I might add I got some very good results (on a small surface, preamp sides, ca. 2x14")) with somehow simpler steps. It was a wood surface and I uses only polyurethane clear coat (glossy). First coat with more thinner (20%) then 5-10% thinned as indicated on can. After 5-6 coats (sand lightly at #400 between coats) I sanded the surface down using #400 wet (add some dish detergent to the water for the wet sanding part) , and a glass block as a sanding block. I got that one at a picture framer's shop (had him break a piece of ca. 1/4" thickness for me to size).

The glass block method really does wonders. I had to sand really hard and quite a while but it was worth it. After 2 additional coats with only light sanding at #600 wett with glass block it now looks like coated with absolutely flat glass.

I always use brushes btw. At the appropriate lacquer viscosity the lines flow together. If they don't, you don't use enough thinner. If you get paint runs, you thin too muych and/or you apply too much material at one time. Follow can instructions religiously, and if that fails, experiment. Thinning is kind of an art.

I used roller brush for one project only, and each coat always ended up with a nice randomly-dimpled surface - nice for a wall but gross for lacquer

Good luck and happy sanding

MBK
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th June 2005, 01:40 AM   #24
diyAudio Member
 
Madmike2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Toronto
Jesus every mistake you all told me not to make i am making .

You see, this is why there are 5 people building cars in IASCA events. No one person knows how to do all things great. Gonna have to sand the crap out of this and start again



Bill, dont hang yourself. I sprayed on the primers. Then tried the colours in plastic. Didnt do what i wanted so i bought a can of laquer and some brushes and some rollers. I see that THAT was also wrong. I am going back to spraying, it was closer to good then now.
__________________
Persistence is better then intelligence. Unless persistence kills you.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13th June 2005, 12:48 AM   #25
diyAudio Member
 
Madmike2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Toronto
Just to update those of you Debby Travis's out there. I did the thinning and rolling, man what a diff. It settles alot compared to the last attempt. I cant even function the spray cans right so i stopped that to.

Heh if this doesnt look right i am going to the old car audio stand by.


Vinyl - Hot box - spray glue - exacto knife - cursing swearing and a few puches thrown at inanimate objects

__________________
Persistence is better then intelligence. Unless persistence kills you.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2005, 12:05 AM   #26
robertG is offline robertG  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Montreal
Default Old fashion way

I tried almost everything to get my boxes to look good (probably 50 or 60 pairs in the last 30 years or so): spray cans, brushes, rollers, poly, latex, varnish, you name it.

Then, I had an illumination: shellac!!

It's been out of fashion since the 1920s so it's a bit hard to get, but it's the most advance "obsolete" finishing material available.

First of all, it costs close to nothing. It comes in dry flakes (or powder). You mix the required quantity in denatured alcohol (and let it stand for 24 hours). It dries instantly, smells close to nothing, can be applied with a brush (and cleans with amonia) and gives a beautiful shine. This material is so fantastic, no wonder it's not sold anymore.

Now there is a process called "french polishing". It has nothing to do with polishing. Basically, it's wiped on shellac (any clean old cotton T shirt will do). To prevent the T shirt from sticking to the drying shellac (remember, it dries in seconds), a small quantity of oil (I use pure virgin olive oil) acts as a lubricant.

The beauty of french polishing is that you see a beautiful high gloss deep finish building before your eyes. FYI, french polishing was used to finish pianos and guitars and violins - nowadays, UV coating is used (because it can be sprayed on and dries with UV light). But if you have some time, try this technique as a final coating (the underlying color might be oil based).
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2005, 05:50 AM   #27
Jennice is offline Jennice  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Planet Earth
Shellac !? Sounds kinda' interesting. I got a few questions, though:
did you mean that the underlying paint CAN or MUST be oil based?

I don't get the idea of french polishing. Do you mean to wipe before the shellac dries or when it's totally dry? A little more details would be cool!

Jennice
__________________
I get paid to break stuff. My g/f gets paid to play with children. Life is good.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2005, 06:23 AM   #28
diyAudio Member
 
Bill Fitzpatrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Eugene, OR
Quote:
Originally posted by Jennice

I don't get the idea of french polishing. Do you mean to wipe before the shellac dries or when it's totally dry? A little more details would be cool!
Ah ha. You want details? You got details.

http://www.milburnguitars.com/fpbannerframes.html
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2005, 07:47 AM   #29
owen is offline owen  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Shilton
Bill,
as usual a fantastic site... Fabulous. truely fabulous.

Have a fine day!

Owen
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th June 2005, 12:43 PM   #30
robertG is offline robertG  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Montreal
Bill's reference site is one of the most complete and accurate one.

I would use oil based underlying color.

And by the way, artists colors are much more better than regular oil paint (ok it takes a bit of time to get it right), being highly concentrated pigment, you can dilute it much more and get high coverage.

Also, you can add a touch (a few drops) of Japanese siccative agent, and the paint will dry very rapidly.

It can also be applied with a rag so you get a very high quality finish with absolutely no brush marks.

And since we are in the old world techniques section of DIY, Damar varnish is another fabulous finishing product and you can achieve spectacular results by mixing a very small amount of undelying oil-color with damar, in order to get an incredible color deepness (it gives the impression of a very thick finish, similar to chineese lacquer).
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Paint steel chassis with the "aluminum paint" used on wire fence? vax9000 Tubes / Valves 2 23rd July 2006 01:14 AM
lead vs sand IZHAKKATZ Analogue Source 15 4th November 2004 04:21 PM
Sand sandwich Vikash Multi-Way 48 10th April 2004 04:13 PM
Epoxy + sand for speakers? mulebarn Multi-Way 13 26th February 2004 04:29 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:50 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2