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Old 14th May 2005, 12:33 PM   #1
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Default Questions on Black Lacquer

Hello all,

My center speaker project is coming along pretty well. It looks like a bookshelf version of my Klipsch towers. I plan on veneering the top, bottom,sides and the front and back panels will be a black laquer finish. I emailed Klipsch on the type of finish they used and it was a 40 sheen black lacquer. They mentioned Sherman-Williams as a source, but after talking to the salesman on the phone, I think that's just going to be too expensive for just two panels.

He did mention a product that could give me the results that I want and was available from any Home Depot and/or Lowe's, It was called Deft and it's a brushable type of lacquer for about $15-$20. I haven't had any luck finding it though.

What do you guys think about it? Good product or is there a better option for me to use? Thanks.
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Old 14th May 2005, 01:13 PM   #2
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Using the search button showed me lots of threads that have relevant info .

http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/searc...der=descending
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Old 14th May 2005, 01:58 PM   #3
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Using the search button showed me lots of threads that have relevant info.

I already did that. That was one reason why I posted my question. There were a couple of threads I did see in your link though, that I didn't come across on my initial search. Appreciate the link. Thanks.

I did google for Deft and came across their website here:

Deft Finishes

I have a feeling you gurus will tell me spraying is going to be better than brushing though when it comes to lacquer.
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Old 14th May 2005, 08:42 PM   #4
delwon is offline delwon  United States
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Deft laquer is a good product. Spraying is always easier than brushing when it comes to finishing. It's not impossible to get a good finish with bruching, but it's a lot more work. I've heard that there are some paint places that will put laquer into spray cans. I haven't checked on it though.
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Old 14th May 2005, 09:05 PM   #5
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You can also purchase refillable spray cans. They use a replaceable compressed gas cylinder and a jar for your finish.

I've seen them at auto parts stores and some hardware stores.
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Old 15th May 2005, 04:21 AM   #6
Greg B is offline Greg B  United States
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The main trick to lacquer is lots and lots of sanding - wet. Brushing is less smooth so it takes more coats and more sanding. Deft is fine. Make sure the box is a smooth as a baby's butt before you start. Use bondo, spackle, filler, whatever. Your last 4-5 coats should be clear. Lacquer can be dyed with black aniline dye. So basically, seal and fill and prep sand. Spray or brush color coats. Spray or brush clear coats, leveling drips or whatever between coats with about 320-400. Sand up to about 800 grit and buff out with a power buffer.

GB
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Old 15th May 2005, 04:22 AM   #7
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I just had this conversation with a friend who used to paint cars for a living. He now builds houses and sprays lacquer on all the trim work (doors, windows, baseboards, etc.), so he knows quite a bit. He said for MDF, you must sand to at least 220 grit. You then use lacquer primer and sand smooth. You then spray a light coat of lacquer, wait 5 minutes and then spray another coat, wait 5 minutes and spray a third coat. Let it dry overnight, and you should be ready to go. If not, you can sand with wet/dry and mineral spirits and keep putting on coats until you are satisfied. But the key is initial surface preparation. Absolutely smooth is the key. He uses Kel-Tone, I think it's called, but he said any automotive lacquer will work for speakers. I also saw some Krylon lacquer in a can at the hardware store the other day. You might try that.

Now for my input: There is a product made in Canada called the Critter sprayer. It's found in woodworking catalogs. It's a mason jar siphon sprayer that really works. It's brain dead simple, and all you need is any compressor that will put out at least 40 PSI and 3 CFM. It's about $40. amd it really does work. I've sprayed tons of small projects with it but no lacquer yet, unfortunately, but it excels at highly-thinned finishes.

Doug
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Old 15th May 2005, 11:08 PM   #8
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Sorry for the wrong impression, but I get a feeling you all think I'm going for a piano black mirror finish for my speaker. Do you still have to put that much prep for a duller finish? Just curious.

The best way to describe it is, it's a sort of flat finish. Satin like if you will.

Some one mentioned Krylon. Could I get what I need, or is that going to be a "you get what you pay for" issue.

When I emailed Klipsch's customer service a couple weeks ago, they recommend Sherman-Williams. I called SW, but it's more or less going to be too much money for what I want to do. I'm only going to lacquer the front/back panels so I figured something like a pint would be ideal for me if not a quart.

Thank again.
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Old 15th May 2005, 11:36 PM   #9
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I believe the sheen comes from how you rub it out after you spray the lacquer, but I'm not the right person to advise you on that. So, yes, you still need to put the effort into the initial prep.

The Krylon is really cheap, like $3-4. If you can get it, buy a can and try it out on a test surface. I guess the cheapness is relative. Speakers don't get a lot of abuse, unlike car paint, and I'm guessing that higher durability is the only thing higher-grade lacquers will bring to the table.

Doug
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Old 15th May 2005, 11:39 PM   #10
delwon is offline delwon  United States
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Krylon would work just fine. I believe they have satin and semi-gloss. Just spray some of their primer on and sand it after it's dry. Then spray your color finish and you should have a finish that you like.
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