When to use baffle step compensation? - diyAudio
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Old 6th May 2005, 05:53 AM   #1
tmblack is offline tmblack  United Kingdom
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Default When to use baffle step compensation?

When is baffle step compensation step necessary?

I haven't heard of many commercial speakers using this technique.

Tom
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Old 6th May 2005, 06:16 AM   #2
Ola is offline Ola
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I have 3-way speakers with low crossover in baffle step region - about 350 Hz. Changed filter connections, so midrange and tweeter ares connecteed to same cable posts.

Biamped them and played with upper amp volume. At certain level sound suddenly became much more real. Can't say how many dB-s the drop is. From the ear I's say 1,5 - 2 dB.

To my hearing most commercial sprekers have a drop between 100 - 500 hZ. Upper part may be very clean and realistic, but overall not real. And then bass sounds from under 100 Hz suddenly jump up. But many people don't share my view and are happy with the usual stuff, including for example guys who design Audes speakers.
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Old 6th May 2005, 11:07 AM   #3
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Default Re: When to use baffle step compensation?

Quote:
Originally posted by tmblack
When is baffle step compensation step necessary?

I haven't heard of many commercial speakers using this technique.

Tom
Any time the baffle isn't big enough to reinforce the bass like it does the midrange. IOW allmost any two way.

A three way is often a better solution if you want to keep the sensitivity high. Maybe double 12's or a single 15 side firing in a deep but narrow cabinet crossed where the mid starts falling off from the narrow front baffle?

Many commercial 2/ways use it. That's why most are power suckers. (96 db or lower sensitivity)
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Old 6th May 2005, 11:10 AM   #4
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Quote:
When is baffle step compensation necessary?
Anytime when any kind of baffle/box is used. There are various techniques how to do. One of them was written by Ola. You can also attenuate higher frequencies or boost lower ones independetly on xover freq..
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Old 6th May 2005, 09:02 PM   #5
tmblack is offline tmblack  United Kingdom
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My speakers are each 42cm wide and the bass measures reasonable flat withoiut such compensation.

Does B&W uses it in the top models?

Tom
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Old 7th May 2005, 03:01 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by tmblack
My speakers are each 42cm wide and the bass measures reasonable flat withoiut such compensation.

Does B&W uses it in the top models?

Tom
Hi Tom, what driver and tuning and how do you measure them? Are they very sensitive at 30 cycles?

Thanks
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Old 7th May 2005, 07:34 AM   #7
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Start here

http://www.t-linespeakers.org/tech/b...intro-bds.html

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Old 7th May 2005, 12:52 PM   #8
Ola is offline Ola
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Hi tmblack,

it's not the problem of on-axis measurements only. Power response suffers even more.

To my ears B&W is mostly ususal stuff.

Have You read Olson's dectription about tuning Ariel's filter?
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Old 8th May 2005, 03:33 AM   #9
soongsc is offline soongsc  Taiwan
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The answer to such a simple question is really complicated. Whenever you try and do a BSC, you also change the phase response, and that changes sound. Dave pointed a good starting point, but don't take formulas for granted, otherwise you will end up with an opinion like a "blind man's impressions of an elephant".
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Old 8th May 2005, 11:52 AM   #10
MJK is offline MJK  United States
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I have found that adding a BSC filter improves the phase response. The baffle step phenominon introduces a phase shift of its own that the filter counteracts.
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