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Old 17th December 2004, 11:41 PM   #1
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Default Best/Easiest spray paint for speakers?

Price is no object here. I'm looking for the best and easiest (if there is one) way to paint some speakers. Black is the preferred color. Would like to get a glossy finish; piano would be stellar but medium gloss would be fine as well. The paint also needs to be quite durable, so if my nephews come over and throw a toy and it hits it, it won't necessarily make a mark.

Is there such a product out there, maybe in a spray paint? I know to get a stellar finish it takes coats of primer, sanding, sealant, yada yada yada... I do like the look of the truck bed liner, even though it's not necessarily glossy, but it seems to not hold up well when I do a test with a finger nail. Always leaves a mark.

Thanks!
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Old 18th December 2004, 12:52 AM   #2
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Hi, I do not know the american market, but i found varathane "colours in plastic" the easiest to apply with excellent results. Sanding with 400 paper between coats omproves the result even more.
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Old 18th December 2004, 01:30 AM   #3
joensd is offline joensd  Germany
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The "easiest" lacquer IMO is granite effect lacquer.
Mind you its a "structure"-lacquer and wont have a plain surface.
You can slightly sand it down though and apply a clear lacquer (parquet kind) to make kids-safe.
http://www.visaton.de/vb/showthread....it+effekt+lack
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Old 18th December 2004, 01:43 AM   #4
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I used Home Depot's gloss white lacquer and with clear lacquer over top. Got great results. Screwdriver slipped when installing drivers, scratched front baffle pretty deep. Fixed really easily and buffed out.
Phil
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Old 18th December 2004, 04:29 AM   #5
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Wow guys, looks great.

I just got home from my brother's house and he just got a new huge air compressor. I'm thinking of maybe using that since it's available. Do you think I could get much better results with an air compressor and spray gun? If so, which type of primer/paint will I need?

Thanks!
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Old 18th December 2004, 05:01 AM   #6
bbksv is offline bbksv  United States
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Ive just primed and used automotive paint
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Old 18th December 2004, 08:53 AM   #7
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Default solutions

well you have a few options. First, you have the safer of the two. Laquer. stay away from your home depot stuff, and go get the real acryllic autobody stuff. Laquer is easy to apply, easy to fix mistakes, and if you wear a respirator and ventalate the area won't kill you either. The end result however isn't as shiny or as durable as urethane and can be sprayed with cheaper guns. Once you get about 9 coats or so on, you can wet sand it and buff it out. I must however stress that if you arn't familiar with propper surface prep then your results won't be too good. you need to start by filling all gaps, and then sand the filler. Prime the entire unti with a high build primer. It may take numerous coats and repeated sanding before you get this right. You will need to wetsand with atleast 800 gritt to get the scratches out prior to color coating. Remember don't mix enamels and laquers unless you like redoing everything from scratch. You can use any autobody base for color, and I recomend valspar for price. I use Dupont, but it's not cheap at all at 100 per quart. If you want to get truely professional results you will need alot more equipment. I use three different guns, a makeshift spray booth, a huge air compressor, and 15 different grades of sand paper. Email me for more tips. I use Urethane paint but I can't recomend it becasue the hardeners contain a toxic chemical that is dangerous to ling function and must be sprayed in the propper environment while wearing a supplied air respirator. Remember never sand unless you are using a block behind your sandpaper. I think your best bet is to have a local body shop do it.
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Old 18th December 2004, 08:53 AM   #8
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Default Urethane

I almost forgot that when I say urethane I'm not refering to the stuff you can buy at your local home improvement store. I'm refering to Autobody paint. For more info please go to the follwoing sites. For safety don't ever buy anything that requires a hardener, becasue it probably contains some derivitive of isocynates.

www.sharpe1.com
look at the docter gun forum, but be ready to get a huge air compressor.

http://www.ppg.com/cr-refinish/phase1/frmHome.asp

http://www.performancecoatings.dupon...troller/Action!_pageDispatcher/InnerModel!dpc/modules/Login/OuterModel!dpc/common/Controller/InnerAction!visitorAction

http://www.sassafety.com/
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Old 18th December 2004, 08:53 AM   #9
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Default spray guns

the latest in spray gun tech is, RP conventional, look at the sharpe titatium compliant gun. and for primer I would buy a devilbiss finishline III with a 1.8mm fluid tip. Follow Dr. Gun's instructions for testing air capacity. Try to not keep the air compressor running all the time to avoid spraying with hot air. Body shops have dryers and coolers on the lines to avoid this. If you can put some type of filter in the line to screen debris I would and they are usually sold at autobody supply places for 8 bucks or less. For money savings I would go with Valspar primer filler, followed by a coat of white primer sealer, and then basecoat. Valspar paint is **** as far as cars go but it's good enough for speakers where weather and color match isn't as important. Usually basecoats reduce by half. Then finally Clear with AC-355 or AC-4400, I would use the one with the faster flash since your not in a spray boot. Pretty much anyway you will have to wetsand with 1500 gritt and buff when your done, but the faster the flash the less dust to sand out. I use Dupont Chromabase over generic primer filler and a dupont primer sealer. I then topcoat with Dupont 7600 SpeedClear. Using any of the finshes above requires a spray booth and propper use of a supplied air respirator to prevent permanant lung damage or lung failure. Lethal exposure can be in small amouts for highly sensatized individuals, and there's no way to know if your sensatized or not. If you make even a microscopic error in the primer coats it will show up when the clear shrinks up in about a month. Unless you have done this before I can assure you that you have no idea how perfect the substrate has to be to produce shiny glass like results. The professional paints, when used correctly, however do make getting qualtiy results alot easier then with consumer furniture finishes. Final buffing is done by wet sanding the finish with 1500 gritt paper followed by a quality compound. Everybody who knows finishing uses the 3m Finesse It system. The other systems are made for cured finishes. depending on the clear you will be ready to sand and buff in as litttle as 2 hours, but a reasonable cure is usually achieved in a few 3-4 days and it should be able to pass the fingernail test you speak of in about a month. Even though these finishes are chemically cured they still have solvent to evaporate. Remember the primer can take forever to get right. sealer is usually 1-2 light coats. Base is between 2-5 light coats. and Clear is usually high build and only requires 3 coats. If you new I might spray more like 6-8 to allow some extra clearance for sanding and buffing. For propper gun technique refer to Dr. Gun. HVLP and conventional have a different techniqe. AS you get better you will also get faster. Lastly I can't share this but I actually have a secret that completely avoids the surface prep stage all togather. It also yields a perfectly flat surface. But I can't let out all the secrets.
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Old 18th December 2004, 11:47 AM   #10
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Default Not Easy

I'm thinking of using this on my MTM TL (TQWT) project PianoLac.

Man, I should have bought that Graco Sprayer!

PS: that would be the Black Wood Lacquer
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