Room coupled loudspeakers? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 25th November 2004, 06:09 PM   #1
suprf1y is offline suprf1y  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: SW Ontario
Default Room coupled loudspeakers?

I really like this board. Moderating the new posts is a good idea. I guess it frustrates the spammers.
As I've said before, I'm just getting back into the hobby, and have some questions. Before the internet, my only source of speaker info was speaker builder magazine, and I built lots of projects based on things I saw, and read in the magazine.
I remember building something called a 'room coupled' loudspeaker. They had top firing woofers, and were placed right against the wall. As I recall, I really liked the sound. Does anybody still do this, or were these just a bad idea? Would it make sense to try and build a TL variation of this?
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th November 2004, 05:26 PM   #2
suprf1y is offline suprf1y  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: SW Ontario
Nobody?
I thought they sounded good
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th November 2004, 09:44 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: dry ol Melbourne Australia
Not exactly sure that 'room coupled' is a specific style of box building. If a tweeter or mid were to fire up, it might be called omni-directional. In some Shanihinan speakers, tweeters mids &/ or bass fire up at about 30 degrees, to bounce off the wall and create a more spacious sound, at the cost of imaging.

Was it Lyn Olson (amongst others) who advocated having bass drivers in an otherwise normal vertical position, very close to the floor, to assist room gain.
Firing *up would assist room gain less, due to distance from drivers to ceiling.

Was the wall behind the speakers hard, eg concrete, so that it absorbned less sound and reflected more?
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th November 2004, 10:46 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Brett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Quote:
Originally posted by rick57
Was it Lyn Olson (amongst others) who advocated having bass drivers in an otherwise normal vertical position, very close to the floor, to assist room gain.
Originally it was Roy Allison.
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th November 2004, 10:52 PM   #5
suprf1y is offline suprf1y  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: SW Ontario
Quote:
Was the wall behind the speakers hard, eg concrete, so that it absorbned less sound and reflected more?
I think that was the idea. I looked in some of my back issues, but the only thing I could find was something similar by RDL acoustics called 'room designed', whatever that means.
I remember building them one weekend as a filler project when I had nothing else going on, and recall that they did sound pretty good.
I just wondered if a TL version might sound even better?
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th November 2004, 11:57 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: dry ol Melbourne Australia
TLs go deep (or is it rolloff slowly?) but are probably the hardest to get right.

Search here on them, look at Planet 10's TL site, and/ or get a copy of Dickasonís Loudspeaker Cookbook.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th November 2004, 09:09 AM   #7
suprf1y is offline suprf1y  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: SW Ontario
I found a project in one the back issues, and it was Roy Allison's design ideas that they were trying to copy.
These aren't the ones, but they looked like this.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ichiban.jpg (57.2 KB, 170 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th November 2004, 10:47 AM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: dry ol Melbourne Australia
Default beaming of drivers

A six inch wonít have much output sideways. I would guess that such a layout would loss output from maybe 300-500 Hz up to the tweeter crossing in, maybe at 2500 Hz. You donít mind that?
I suggest you read up on the beaming of drivers, based on driver size & frequency.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th November 2004, 08:26 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Brett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Default Re: beaming of drivers

Quote:
Originally posted by rick57
A six inch wonít have much output sideways. I would guess that such a layout would loss output from maybe 300-500 Hz up to the tweeter crossing in, maybe at 2500 Hz. You donít mind that?
I suggest you read up on the beaming of drivers, based on driver size & frequency.
Or you could simply put another midbass on the front too, like Castle do.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th November 2004, 09:25 PM   #10
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New Hampshire
You might want to look at the David speaker at my site. The woofer is a folded horn with the exit at the bottom of the box, and altering the position relative to the rear and side walls allows adjustment of the output from 20 to 120 Hz.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Advantages of Floor Coupled Up-Firing Speakers graaf Multi-Way 3200 12th August 2014 10:15 AM
capacitor coupled vs. direct coupled ouput hugobross Solid State 11 21st January 2011 01:56 AM
loudspeakers and room interaction jlo Multi-Way 1 25th July 2007 08:17 PM
open baffle loudspeakers and room size Russell Sit Multi-Way 29 7th July 2004 04:44 AM
Can someone explain parafeed & direct coupled & a.c. coupled? mwmitchell Tubes / Valves 2 11th September 2002 01:10 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:44 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2