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Old 10th November 2004, 01:42 AM   #1
VvvvvV is offline VvvvvV  United Kingdom
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Default Making cabinets by pouring molten plastic on something

I've got quite a lot of plastic in the backyard, and I'm tempted to melt it in a kind of cauldron and pour it over a cardboard box covered with aluminium foil/ some similar mould. Insanity? The way forward? It should be easy to research plastic recycling and melting, the advantage would be 1 inch thick plastic cabinets
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Old 10th November 2004, 01:52 AM   #2
Magura is offline Magura  Denmark
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You can't just pour plastics, you need to inject it in a mold under relativly high pressure to make anything thats got any structural purpose. Depending what type of plastics it is you have, it might even explode if molten in an open bath.

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Old 10th November 2004, 03:06 AM   #3
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High presure, possibly explosive? Wow, sounds like the kind of fun that attracts us to DIY stuff, or maybe not.
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Old 10th November 2004, 03:09 AM   #4
Mr Evil is offline Mr Evil  United Kingdom
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There are other techniques than injection moulding. If you can somehow form it into sheets then you could use compression moulding, i.e. heat it and squash it between two halves of a mould.
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Old 10th November 2004, 08:45 AM   #5
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For moulding, you need to use casting resin but it will work out (very) expensive for items like loudspeaker cabinets!

There is also a 'coating' resin that you can pour over horizontal surfaces to produce a hard plastic finish.

But if you want to try something different, polystyrene sheet makes excellent loudspeaker housings!
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Old 10th November 2004, 03:13 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nuuk
But if you want to try something different, polystyrene sheet makes excellent loudspeaker housings!
I'm glad you've got a smile after that comment.

I tried it once. Couldn't hear a thing.
Too well insulated.
But easy to tote.

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Old 10th November 2004, 03:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
I'm glad you've got a smile after that comment.
I'm deadly serious! And I'm basing my statement on experience and lots of experimenting!
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Old 10th November 2004, 04:09 PM   #8
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That must be some highly compressed polystyrene. Not the stuff used for roofing insulation. We use type I, type II, both of which are expanded bead and type IV which is extruded. None of which are suitable for enclosures, too porous. Not dense enough.

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Old 10th November 2004, 04:23 PM   #9
Nuuk is offline Nuuk  United Kingdom
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Quote:
None of which are suitable for enclosures, too porous. Not dense enough.
If people use open baffles, how can anything be 'too porous'?

And you are also assuming that the polystyrene is the only material used.
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Old 10th November 2004, 04:25 PM   #10
VvvvvV is offline VvvvvV  United Kingdom
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I thought molten plastic was like treacle, it may take several layers of pouring and sorting through only plastic that melts, but it should be possible to make a fair polystyrene product, the finished product would look wild like some molten magma or something.
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