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Old 30th May 2004, 05:14 AM   #11
kspv is offline kspv  India
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Default In India...

A very interesting thread...

I have read somewhere in this very forum, that once the human ear gets used to a particular sound, it stops noticing the defects in it, and that kind of adaptation takes a mere couple of hours of listening. May be this would explain why even the bad speakers/amps sound good sometimes to some people.

In India, it is usual for commercial speaker manufacturers to put in a peak in amp/speaker frequency response around 10 KHz. The manufacturers would explain it as "Indian taste". Many singers of Indian music (some of whom gained national repute) , alter their voicing to the point of sounding squeaky, i.e., don't sing with their natural voice. Even the recordings of Indian film music are done in such a way, that they are very bright by european standards. If a typical Indian (I am not speaking of those who have some knowledge about sound) is given an audition of a pair of very flat sounding audiophile speakers, it is very likely that he finds them dull and boring, and is unlikely to find them "musical".

May be things like distortion, brightness, harshness etc., do not matter with respect to musicality upto a certain threshold. It is all in "getting used" to the sound.
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Old 30th May 2004, 07:44 AM   #12
MBK is offline MBK  Singapore
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Definitely, we get used to particular sound signatures, and I have noticed for myself the most reliable indicator for a positive change in my system is my gut reaction to the first seconds playing. After that I get too much used to it and I have to start "analyzing rationally" which leads straight down to the hell of "rationalization" .

But the aim of a good system should still be undistorted sound, or at least, an "even" or "neutral" kind of distortion that doesn't affect certain aspects only. Maybe this is the message here...
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Old 30th May 2004, 07:57 AM   #13
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Kpsv

I agree, I once did sound for an Asian music festival in London, and was shocked by what the headline act's sound guy did to the graphics as soon as he arrived on site...But the punters loved it!

Circlotron,

I sympathise with your predicament, it is very easy if you have no references for the mind to get acclimatised to one particular sound. This happens in all the human senses and is of great evolutionary and survival benefit.

The only answer I'm afraid, is to get out more to live music, or (the preferred option ), just build lots more speakers so you have a contrast!
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Old 30th May 2004, 11:21 AM   #14
Coolin is offline Coolin  Netherlands
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Default Indian sound.

I know what you mean with regards to the indian sound with more high frequencies.
There is an even more extreme sound though.......

In the middle east some radio and/or TV stations seem to love the sound of distortion. The kind that that sounds like a square wave is mixed in which gives ALOT of upper harmonics. They also love the sound of overloaded close microfoning, this has the same sound.
I think this is where it all started. To this day many parts of the middle east are not devoloped like the west. Many people have grown up listening to with the sound of cheap equipment and cheap overdriven horn megaphones on mosks to comunicate to the people. I guess this is why they still like this kind ove sound.

I must say though that these parts of the world are much more in touch with their music than the west. Im talking street music here, not recording contracts.
The west has "moved on" to other things regretably.

I guess little distortion (harmonics) can add some "spice" to the music. Like the well ballanced distortion of a tube amplifier also is said to sound more pleasing.

Coolin
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Old 30th May 2004, 02:55 PM   #15
Rocky is offline Rocky  Norway
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ProAc Response 2.5 is an example of a speaker who exploits the resonances to it's advantage.. Built of 19mm MDF with no bracing, but dressed in Bitumen to shorten the resonance period.. IIRC..
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Old 31st May 2004, 01:02 PM   #16
Al.M is offline Al.M  Myanmar
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Rocky,

Funny you should mention the Proac 2.5, I was just going to mention this myself. We've been attempting to clone the damn thing for many years before the proper design came to us by chance (see the clone website). Whether one may agree with the ethics of cloning or not, 3 years later after the clone website was going people have commented over whether bracing the cabinet is benificial or not.

Anyway one gentleman from Italy who cloned the thing well before anyone did commented that he built 2 versions, one heavily braced with 25mm side walls and one as standard with no bracing and thinner walls. His conclusion was the non-braced thinner walled version was much more musical and didn't sound as cold as the other one. This experiment may just apply to this particular design.

By the way the commercial Proac 2.5 came in braced and unbraced models, but the bracing was minimal, just a 50mm thick bracing side wall to side wall cleaverly housed around the port.
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Old 31st May 2004, 04:04 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by Al.M

Anyway one gentleman from Italy who cloned the thing well before anyone did commented that he built 2 versions, one heavily braced with 25mm side walls and one as standard with no bracing and thinner walls. His conclusion was the non-braced thinner walled version was much more musical and didn't sound as cold as the other one. This experiment may just apply to this particular design.
Must have been a member of the Amati family.
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