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Old 3rd May 2004, 10:21 PM   #1
brumil is offline brumil  United States
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Default low frequency L pad

Hello all,

I am brand new here. I am designing a x-over network and am using 2 woofers in parallel configuration. My LF impedence drops to 2.09 ohms @ 20hz. I believe my Rotel power amp might not enjoy this. I want to add an L pad to the woofers. I know I need large power handling resistors. Is using a LF L pad sonically acceptable? I know I could run them in series, but I know THAT is not.

Help!
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Old 4th May 2004, 12:24 AM   #2
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Wiring woofers in series is acceptable. Padding woofers is not.
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Old 4th May 2004, 12:14 PM   #3
brumil is offline brumil  United States
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Guess I had it backwards after all. Thanks Bill!

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Old 4th May 2004, 02:07 PM   #4
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I understand that wiring a single woofer with dual voice coils in series makes a sonic difference because Le increases by a factor of 4 vs parallel. Why wouldn't series vs parallel connection for 2 woofers have the same effect?

Also, please explain why padding a woofer is bad other than wasting power. I did this on a pair of speakers for someone who listens to classical music but he wanted more bass for LFE's in his HT and for when his son listens to his type of music without adding a sub. An Lpad is on the tweeters as well. I had to do it this way because the Lpad wouldn't work right on the mids because they are an array wired with a higher impedance. I tried alot of different wiring combinations and this way gave the best sound balance and a highly adjustable speaker. With both Lpads set to minimum it's a little heavy on the bass and treble (the way his son likes). It's not a high power application and the Lpad on the woofer has held up so far. Did I do something wrong?
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Old 4th May 2004, 04:19 PM   #5
Jay is offline Jay  Indonesia
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Why should it be wrong? I did the same thing with low powered amplifier and a bookshelf sized speaker and my friends like it a lot. But I guessed that would be fatiguing.
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