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Old 1st April 2004, 02:10 PM   #1
philip is offline philip  Canada
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Default Fibreglass enclosure finishing

On one or two occasions there have been amazing pictures of people who have done amazing things with their speaker enclosures by covering the front with some sort of stretchy material and applying fibreglass. The result is a contoured, perfectly shaped front to their speakers. Examples can be found in the permanent post, "System pictures and description" on pages 11 (or thereabouts) and 20.

System Pictures & Description

However, every time these pictures appear, questions to how this is done are not answered. I have searched the forum a few times and cannot find any threads or posts discussing this either. As I don't know what is being done, searches on google are hard and don't yield much. Therefore, is there anyone out there who knows how to do this to their speakers? Thanks for your help,

Philip
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Old 2nd April 2004, 10:27 AM   #2
philip is offline philip  Canada
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Default Some information

This might be bargain basement stuff for those who already know how to work with fibreglass, but I was checking out the internet and found a few sites that provide some help:

http://forums.skylinesdownunder.co.n...c/31322-1.html

http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/S.../5051/gpod.htm

http://www.talkaudio.co.uk/vbb/showt...802#post615802

So, you begin by covering your surface with some sort of stretchy material: what material seems unclear. One guy uses pantyhose, and a couple others use "stretchy material" from a fabric store. Is there a best one?

The next step is a bit up in the air, and it seems it has been done three ways. First, cover the material with some sort of resin which hardens. Secondly, you could cover with resin, and then fibreglass. I think the resin hardens the material so when you apply the fibreglass the material doesn't sag. Third, although I'm not sure if this is an option, but it wasn't chronicled on the diyaudio thread (above), is lay fibreglass directly over the stretchy material.

It seems that whenever you apply fibreglass, to get a smooth surface, it's necessary to cover with some sort of spray filler to fill in all the cracks. Then, when this hardens, you can sand it and get a really smooth finish. In fact, even if I don't use fibreglass I'm going to look into using this stuff for the outside of my enclosures instead of wood filler! It seems so much easier and would provide a surface so much smoother.

Any information from those who know more would be welcome.

Philip
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Old 3rd April 2004, 10:19 PM   #3
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Why don't you contact Raami and see what he is using for the cloth, thickness of the fiberglass, type of resin and modus operandi.

Cal
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Old 4th April 2004, 12:09 AM   #4
bbksv is offline bbksv  United States
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there are a few different materials they use.....and I believe the best is fleece (like sweatshirt material).....another good one is speaker grill cloth. Either way you need to re-enforce it with fiberglass mat/cloth.

Ive been using this method for a long time for car audio use...and the best place I have found for learning is Glassman's custom forum on yahoo......but you have to get an account...which is like 2 bucks USD...
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Old 4th April 2004, 12:13 AM   #5
bbksv is offline bbksv  United States
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also...the spray filler used is usually feather fill....good stuff. It is like spray bondo. You can also use duraglass...for areas you need to fill in...and need some strength....and to fill in some smaller areas...use a light weight filler...like slick sand..or rage gold.

The feather fill can actually be sprayed on pretty thick.....so it is very easy to work with..
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Old 4th April 2004, 04:08 PM   #6
philip is offline philip  Canada
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Cal: I actually tried to contact Raami but to no avail. I didn't post because it was already a page or two old and didn't want to disrupt the way the conversation was going - also, I think this is a subject that should have its own post anyways.

Hey BBKSV, thanks for all the info. When you say "Either way you need to re-enforce it with fiberglass mat/cloth," do you apply resin first, so as the cloth won't sag when you put it on - that's what resin does, hardens the cloth, right?

As for the filler, I don't actually know a lot of the terminology involved. What is feather fill, bondo, and duraglass? What spray filler do you think Raami used, or did he use both?

Thanks for your help guys,

Philip
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Old 4th April 2004, 04:57 PM   #7
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I'd like to know what is done with the gap (void) between the cloth and the cabinet? Even with a few ounces of fiberglass it strikes me that there might be some resonances to deal with.

Although I must say it certainly looks striking, what a beautifull appearance.

Cal
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Old 4th April 2004, 04:58 PM   #8
bbksv is offline bbksv  United States
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Well...basically here is how it works....you might need a little imagination to understand what I am talking about. First you need to cut out an MDF circle....about an inch and a half larger than the speaker you are using. You can also cut another ring to flush mount the speaker....like the sub in the picture you saw.

Then you take the ring and suspend it over the back of the enclosure (could be out of MDF or more fiberglass)....with a piece of 2x4.

Wrap the fleece over the enclosure...and either staple or spray glue it to the back of the enclosure. It has to be AS TIGHT AS POSSIBLE.....or you will get sags...

Once it is all wrapped....apply fiberglass resin to the fleece...and wait for that to harden. Be sure to not get resin on the part that you glues...because the resin will make the glue release...and you project is pretty much ruined.

When that is hard...then apply fiberglass MAT. I really prefer mat because the resin actually melts it a bit....allowing you to not get wrinkles in the project. You can get all the mat and resin from uscomposites.com......and I highly recomment 1.5 oz fiberglass mat...and the premium polyester resin.

when that is all set up...you need to cover everything with the duraglass or Bondo (this is just a paste that, once catalized, hardens like rock........then sand..sand...sand...and re-fill as needed.

Finally cut out the circle that your speaker will actually go it...and remove the 2x4 that was used to support it.

Some people actually like to also do a "bondo milkshake" inside the box...which is a mixture of resin and bondo. You drill a hole in the enclosure and pour in the milkshake...and roll it around inside the box....this gives you a little more thickness...and seals the corners of the enclosure.

Here is a link to my website...that has a few pix of the build process of a fiberglass enclosure

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 4th April 2004, 05:00 PM   #9
bbksv is offline bbksv  United States
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The milkshake usually fills the void. You can also just use fiberglass...but good luck glassin the inside of an enclosure.....what a freakin mess...
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Old 4th April 2004, 05:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by bbksv
and I highly recomment 1.5 oz fiberglass mat...and the premium polyester resin.
I am surprized that you are only using 1.5 oz mat. This is typical of what a sundeck gets done with. I would have thought you would need a layer of roving first and then a 1 or 2 oz over that to smooth it a bit and achieve the desired stiffness.

Also while you're at it, wouldn't the epoxy resin be better suited for the application? Much more expensive but a much stronger resin as well.

Cal
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