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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Best spikes position under loudspeaker
Best spikes position under loudspeaker
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Old Yesterday, 05:32 PM   #91
kaputt is offline kaputt  Germany
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I'm taking my chance to post something here before it gets locked and/or moved to the lounge. Different types of feet do so little in my (!) experience that the topic seems ridiculous. Controlling vibration goes a long way when it is cabinet/baffle vibration and there the crucial part is easily done with a bit of bracing. For "bass" the right amount of stuffing of a cabinet plays a role and is easily determined with the Altec 9V battery trick.
(What about driver selection, crossovers, cabinets, horn flares? Sure, baby!)
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Old Yesterday, 05:37 PM   #92
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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It intrigued me how my sorbothane feet had the primary function of stopping the cabinet flexing at low frequency
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Originally Posted by kaputt View Post
Different types of feet do so little in my (!) experience that the topic seems ridiculous.
Our experience is different. I would encourage people to experiment, every situation is different.
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Old Yesterday, 06:18 PM   #93
planet10 is offline planet10  Canada
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Best spikes position under loudspeaker
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Originally Posted by Demidemon View Post
The same goes for a woofer cone weighing perhaps 15 grams.

The opposing force may be equal and opposite but the masses involved are orders of magnitude different. Then consider that the sound-producing parts of the driver are not only shaped optimally for sound reproduction but are also suspended as freely as possible so that they might move and make said sound...

Any sound produced by the reaction forces acting down through all the parts of the (not completely rigid cabinet) and on the millions of times more massive and 'not optimally designed for sound production floor' is going to need NASA to put together a system to first cancel out the sound from the speaker so that they then might detect it...

When they then show me evidence that this sound is noticeable to the average human ear over and above the sound of the music (and it wouldn't have been without spikes fitted) then I will concede that you are right. Until then logic and physics must dictate otherwise.
I canít speak for typical tweeters because i donít use them. They are probably more impacted by the reactive force of the woofer but that is a different issue.

As to the woofer ó or in my case usually a FR ó the impact of the movement of that cone can significantly affect the box. With each new build we play music and listen to various parts of the box to see what sound it makes. If it makes too much sound we go back to the drawing board. With lots of practise we are getting pretty good. But many a typical box is not, MDF boxes in particular tend to be offenders.

If the box is producing significant sound then it sounds boxy or makes the box more audiable destroying any hope of producing the illusion of a 3D image.

A box panel is a large raditor and doesnít need to move much to effectively radiate enuff sound to be obtrusive. Which panel vibrates of course is important. The back or bottom for instance usually arenít as critical as the baffle ó a panel you have to really watch since with those holes cut in to it are weakest.

The average listener, typically untrained to listen (it is an average after all) is incapable of hearing many things. But with training and esxposure to better than average kit can become a better than average listener. A good reason to have better than average kit so that they can grow their listening experience.

dave
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Old Yesterday, 11:48 PM   #94
Demidemon is offline Demidemon  New Zealand
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Originally Posted by planet10 View Post
I can’t speak for typical tweeters because i don’t use them. They are probably more impacted by the reactive force of the woofer but that is a different issue.

As to the woofer — or in my case usually a FR — the impact of the movement of that cone can significantly affect the box. With each new build we play music and listen to various parts of the box to see what sound it makes. If it makes too much sound we go back to the drawing board. With lots of practise we are getting pretty good. But many a typical box is not, MDF boxes in particular tend to be offenders.

If the box is producing significant sound then it sounds boxy or makes the box more audiable destroying any hope of producing the illusion of a 3D image.

A box panel is a large raditor and doesn’t need to move much to effectively radiate enuff sound to be obtrusive. Which panel vibrates of course is important. The back or bottom for instance usually aren’t as critical as the baffle — a panel you have to really watch since with those holes cut in to it are weakest.
Also the driver/s are more directly coupled to the baffle and the baffle is in the same plane as the driver/s (unlike a floor) so it's critical that it's not resonant.
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Originally Posted by planet10 View Post
The average listener, typically untrained to listen (it is an average after all) is incapable of hearing many things. But with training and esxposure to better than average kit can become a better than average listener. A good reason to have better than average kit so that they can grow their listening experience.

dave
Agreed. I started my 'critical listening' in the late 1970s doing sound mixing for a band at live gigs, something I did full-time for three years. There's something about setting up a known system in different venues every week and then having to dynamically compensate for the damping effect of varying numbers of people, sometimes dancing near the speakers, sometimes sitting listening as the evening progresses that teaches you to hear nuances of sound. Since then I've never stopped listening critically. Ultimately I'd like to have speakers and an environment that I can't hear (instead hearing just the music...) and I keep striving towards that aim.

Cheers,
Shaun.

Last edited by Demidemon; Yesterday at 11:48 PM. Reason: typos
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