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Old 1st March 2004, 06:58 PM   #11
Marvin is offline Marvin  Estonia
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally posted by Dave Jones
If I were to undertake such a project, I would definitely write it in Python/wxPython, with C++ extensions only if absolutely necessary for speed. That's a far better solution than starting with one "platform" -- Linux or whatever.
According to my understanding Karoliina's main job is software development. So I'd leave this platform selection up to her. Of cource there are other options - Java, Python, C#/Mono etc but C++ and some cross-platform development toolkit (like Qt) is OK as well. Two supported op. systems is enough and if Mac people feel themselves uncomfortably it is possible to create Mac OS X binaries also - by someone who has appropriate Qt license. Qt license allows royalty-free distribution of binaries so there should be no legal problems.

In my professional life we here are developing POS software using Qt and PostgreSQL. Well-written code compiles without any changes on both platforms. So from my point of view there is nothing wrong with platform selection. Python would be also be ok but if Karoliina feels herself more conviniently in C++ - let's go!

- M -
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Old 1st March 2004, 08:41 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by Marvin
[B]Hi,



According to my understanding Karoliina's main job is software development. So I'd leave this platform selection up to her.
No one likes the self-appointed. But dang it, I'm just trying to help.

Software has been my main job too, since 1971. Of course back then we programmed the paper tape with our belt buckles - and we liked it! These days I have other responsibilities, but I still manage a small group of programmers. And of course, I am leaving it up to her -- (not that I have any choice! :-)) I don't have anything against C++, either. I was one of the 80 or so people at the first C++ conference in 1986, (I think it was), and I frequently talked with the C++ onlie begetter, via email and telephone, about the definition of the new language. I still use C++ exclusively for the realtime layer of the robotics software I'm responsible for today. But I do think anyone who is looking into a project such as the one under discussion would do well to consider wxPython.
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Old 17th March 2004, 01:18 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by Marvin
Hi,
According to my understanding Karoliina's main job is software development. So I'd leave this platform selection up to her. Of cource there are other options - Java, Python, C#/Mono etc but C++ and some cross-platform development toolkit (like Qt) is OK as well.

...

nothing wrong with platform selection. Python would be also be ok but if Karoliina feels herself more conviniently in C++ - let's go!

- M -
Hi,

I am not a big fan of any interpreted languages (Python, Java, ...),
I prefer do tasks at a bit lower level.
I master already C and C++ very
well and I see no reason to learn Python just for this project.
If there would be urgent need to learn Python because of
some work project, perhaps I would then give it some priority
but otherwise, no.

Qt + C++ is so simple and easy combination that I just have
to wonder why I would need to mess up with Python when
it can be done more efficiently with C++ anyway. And Qt is
a cross-platform toolkit anyway, so it shouldn't be a major
problem to do Windows version as well. And in fact, to
be honest, there are only three operating systems out there
that I feel that would be necessary to be supported:

[1] Linux (which runs in both computers, PDAs and mobile terminals in addition to numerous other embedded devices)
[2] Windows (uncle Bill is still rather popular, after all)
[3] Mac OSX (music makers usually prefer Macs)

I see no reason to support dead or dying operating systems or
operating systems that are not intended for desktop use.
Someone could mention that AmigaOS or MorphOS on
Pegasos would worth
having support, but I feel that Linux is better choice for
Pegasos than MorphOS. We are using actually Linux on
G3 and G4 Pegasos computers. We are using also
Linux on Compaq iPaq PDA (we did remove the uncle Bills
limiting WinCE product from it). In fact, we have Linux running in
majority of our computers.

There is one additional operating system that has some
great popularity, Symbian, but I don't see it necessary that
it would be a must that my loudspeaker program would run
on Symbian OS mobile phones which usually feature smaller
spec screens etc. than their more PDA-like counterparts.

And there is more: I rather prefer
to not support soon-to-be-dead
Unix System V derivatives
than to support them,
partially because of they are old-faschioned and partially because
of SCO's ridiculous lawsuit-show that have given me
rather bitter taste of about everything that is derived from
Unix System V.

Of course there are more operating systems out there.
For example in network elements, some dedicated operating
systems are being used (both proprietary and open source),
but a scientific hard fact is that
noone will design loudspeakers with them for sure.

Best Wishes,
Karoliina
-- a happy Linux user
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Old 17th March 2004, 05:54 PM   #14
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Location: Indiana
Default Horn Design

Karoliina,

I applaud your efforts on the design program. Massive undertaking.

I also enjoyed the waveguides you added to the Seas. Very nice.

I include this link for David McBean's Horn Response. Perhaps you have seen it. http://www.users.bigpond.com/dmcbean/

Many horn diy er's find this and, if able, the math of W. Marshall Leach to be useful.

http://users.ece.gatech.edu/~mleach/

Scroll down to publications. These are now available in pdf, where formerly(a few months ago you had to purchase them from AES. The material is quite dense, EE level, but the math models work.

Hope this helps.

Tim Moorman
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Old 17th March 2004, 09:10 PM   #15
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Hi,

Thanks for the links. I have already purchased some horn AES papers.
Lets see what is now online...

I have seen the hornresp -program. I want to have something similar
in my project, if possible.

Best Wishes,
Karoliina
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Old 15th August 2004, 09:28 AM   #16
ArthurG is offline ArthurG  France
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some news on this project ?
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Old 15th August 2004, 08:53 PM   #17
RR is offline RR  Europe
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Location: Spain
Hi Karoliina,

Regarding your interest in cardioids, here are some useful reading:

Harry Olson, Gradient Loudspeakers, March 1973

Thomas J. Holmes, The "Acoustic resistance Box" -A fresh look at an old principle, JAES December 1986

Juha Backman, Theory of Acoustical Resistance Enclosures, AES preprint, May 1999

I have a spreadsheet based on the Holmes paper, quite preliminary but usable. Just tell me if you are interested.

Regards,

Roberto
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Old 16th August 2004, 02:55 PM   #18
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Of course I am interested.
Feel free to send your spread sheet to me!

My e-mail address is:
Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 16th August 2004, 05:55 PM   #19
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Quote:
Hi,

I am not a big fan of any interpreted languages (Python, Java, ...),
I don't care for Java either. Nor Perl, TCL, LISP, whatever. Python is unique.

Quote:

I prefer do tasks at a bit lower level.
I master already C and C++ very
well in
Me too. I even helped in a small way to define the C++ language. I've used C since 1984, and C++ almost daily since 1987 or so.

Quote:
... and I see no reason to learn Python just for this project.
Python is something you would use every day, once you learned it. It is a great calculator program, for example. But even for one large project, it's worth the effort, particularly an open source project. It's also very easy to learn. Check it out:

www.python.org
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Old 17th August 2004, 08:54 AM   #20
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Okay, I tried Python. I agree, it is great calculator
tool and a tool for trying different things.
In that context, Python appears to be excellent,
I will no longer use the KDE calculator now...

However, I still don't think that a such platform is
a good base for a huge program (currently not huge,
later will be) that is supposed
to do complex numerical analysis to calculate some response
curves. Yet alone using C++, the program is currently
not without some waiting times (allthough the calculation
routines currently used are not final, not even nearly).

Let me clarify, the program is aimed to be a
calculation program. Not a script or sheet for some platform
such as MS Excel, Gnumeric, Mathlab etc.
I am also going to add audio support (ALSA) later;
I am planning to implement MLS based measurement
system into it. Btw, anyone with experience with MLS
time windowing, ALSA or Jack is
warmly welcome to take part in the project.
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