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Old 24th February 2004, 01:07 PM   #1
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Default Epoxy + sand for speakers?

Does anyone know where i can purchase something thats mixes with sand that you can use on the inside of speakers?Ive seen different speaker companies use something like this in the past,i just can't find anything like that for sell.

Any suggestions-------> thx
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Old 25th February 2004, 12:19 AM   #2
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anyone?
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Old 25th February 2004, 01:16 AM   #3
eStatic is offline eStatic  United States
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I've used lead shot in latex. It worked well to dampen mdf. I would think that something that cures hard like most epoxies would not be a good choice. But I'm a bit of an ignoramus in these things.
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Old 25th February 2004, 01:29 AM   #4
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Auto undercoating and roof tar work well. They'll hold the sand and provide some viscoelastic damping.
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Old 25th February 2004, 01:54 AM   #5
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try "Quikcrete" -- I did this by making the speaker carcase about 1" larger on each side than necessary -- then I popped some nails in the particleboard to hold the cememt. I used "Quikcrete on each of the 2 sides and rear -- one side at a time, allowing about a day to dry.

they were the heaviest damned speakers I ever built -- but built like Fort Knox. I had to demolish them with a sledge-hammer when we moved from Long Island to NJ.
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Old 25th February 2004, 02:02 AM   #6
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You could use a latex additive that mixes with a portland cement product. It's commonly used for ceramic tile installation. The caution would be to seal the MDF with lacquer/varnish/oil based paint before the "pour". Otherwise the 3/4" will soon be 1-1/4"!
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Old 25th February 2004, 02:05 AM   #7
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Isnt there some kind of sand plus poxy stuff used on boat decks and around swimming pools?

You might try West Marine supply, but I dont know that what Im thinking of will have the density your looking for.

http://www.westmarine.com/
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Old 25th February 2004, 02:15 AM   #8
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once again, if you look to the Aircraft Spruce catalog you can find glass beads that are used as fillers -- very lightweight and strength enhancing.
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Old 25th February 2004, 04:10 AM   #9
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Thx guys---some great ideas
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Old 25th February 2004, 07:50 PM   #10
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What about just using something like this


Dynamat EXTREME: Dynamat Xtreme is a butyl composite with aluminum constraining layer, sheet metal vibrational damper. Dynamat Xtreme is made to conform and fuse to sheet metal and other hard substrates: automotive body surfaces such as floor pans and doors. Product can be die cut to shape and placed onto the body surface after sheet metal cleaning operation and prior to paint system (typically a t the sealer application operation) or on painted panels. Material can withstand temperature ranges between -54C to +149C (-65F to +300F) and is highly resistant to aging.


I don't really see too many people using this inside of speakers---don't really know why


But this is being used inside of a pair of jordan floor standing speakers.


Of course there are the deflex panels also.

Im just toying around with different ideas right now---thx
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