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Old 24th March 2015, 04:47 AM   #1
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Default digital crossover on the cheap cheap

I was wondering if anyone has attempted using software to improve the sound for their exiting systems?

I'm planning on designing and building my speakers (dsps and multiple way amps) later... But first fix up my existing system:

I listen to mostly my own recordings (flacs) have a two way JMR speakers and a Red Wine Audio Sig 16. I was wondering if I could brighten it up a bit, adjust for room characteristics etc. by:

1) Use a mike and digital room correction software to find the crossover frequency, ideal delay of the tweeter, and generally flatten the frequency response.

2) Simply remix my flacs using sox or ffmpeg filters to compensate for my own system and room weaknesses? Instead of active DSPs to provide crossover, just create a script to alter all my flacs at once once I get the settings right, and just keep my old equipment until my evil plans for a new system come to fruition.

Someone must have done that already right? Has anyone had success?

Cheers,
b
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Old 24th March 2015, 05:43 AM   #2
Tweet is offline Tweet  Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobzibub View Post
I was wondering if anyone has attempted using software to improve the sound for their exiting systems?

I'm planning on designing and building my speakers (dsps and multiple way amps) later... But first fix up my existing system:

I listen to mostly my own recordings (flacs) have a two way JMR speakers and a Red Wine Audio Sig 16. I was wondering if I could brighten it up a bit, adjust for room characteristics etc. by:

1) Use a mike and digital room correction software to find the crossover frequency, ideal delay of the tweeter, and generally flatten the frequency response.

2) Simply remix my flacs using sox or ffmpeg filters to compensate for my own system and room weaknesses? Instead of active DSPs to provide crossover, just create a script to alter all my flacs at once once I get the settings right, and just keep my old equipment until my evil plans for a new system come to fruition.

Someone must have done that already right? Has anyone had success?

Cheers,
b
If you want to 'brighten' up the sound of your system and tweak away at your hearts content why not try a 31 band graphic equalizer for each channel. That might be all you need to get it to how you like it.

C.M
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Old 24th March 2015, 06:25 AM   #3
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Tweet, a graphic EQ introduces noise, I guess...
which is the opposite of what Digital People want to achieve : clean, crystal sound...

About the delay in a tweeter: right ! The woofer is big and slow, the tweeter is
little and light
Then there's the passive crossover which introduces anticipation or delay to phase which is reflected in the time domain as in each cycle...
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Old 24th March 2015, 06:46 AM   #4
Tweet is offline Tweet  Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobzibub View Post
I was wondering if anyone has attempted using software to improve the sound for their exiting systems?

I'm planning on designing and building my speakers (dsps and multiple way amps) later... But first fix up my existing system:

I listen to mostly my own recordings (flacs) have a two way JMR speakers and a Red Wine Audio Sig 16. I was wondering if I could brighten it up a bit, adjust for room characteristics etc. by:

1) Use a mike and digital room correction software to find the crossover frequency, ideal delay of the tweeter, and generally flatten the frequency response.

2) Simply remix my flacs using sox or ffmpeg filters to compensate for my own system and room weaknesses? Instead of active DSPs to provide crossover, just create a script to alter all my flacs at once once I get the settings right, and just keep my old equipment until my evil plans for a new system come to fruition.

Someone must have done that already right? Has anyone had success?

Cheers,
b
Pico...., I was responding to that which I have highlighted in his post as an interim measure, it may well be all that he needs to get the sound he wants from his speakers. Sure it's a bit limited but 'until my evil plans for a new system come into fruition'.

C.M
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Old 24th March 2015, 06:52 AM   #5
Shaun is offline Shaun  South Africa
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Here's a cheap way to achieve just that (done by a mate of mine): Car Audio - Idea for quick quality upgrade
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Old 24th March 2015, 06:55 AM   #6
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Eh eh, OP was right when saying about altering the content of the disc: a room correction software does that !
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Old 24th March 2015, 04:14 PM   #7
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dont have any input on the software personally, but it seems quite capable and has a good rep.
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Old 24th March 2015, 06:29 PM   #8
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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Try JRiver as your player. Lots of DSP built in.
Room EQ Wizard can show you what you need to do if you want to measure.
You can go a long long way with just those two.
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Old 24th March 2015, 07:03 PM   #9
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JRiver is very powerful 64 bit DSP engine, it sounds great. You could use it to EQ your passive speakers. But to use it for a digital crossover you will need multichannel DACs and amps.

Most inexpensive digital active crossover boxes like Behringer, miniDSP, Rane, etc, have mediocre sound quality, but they are easy to adjust the filter parameters.

A DIY analog crossover, like Rod Elliot's Project 125, sounds excellent and is easy and cheap to build, but the filters and delay are not adjustable.

Excellent sounding digital crossovers are expensive, but they allow for easy adjustment, and room correction. DEQX is a stand alone box. Or PC software like AudioLense, Acourate or JRiver, outputting to a good quality multichannel DAC like exasound e28 or Buffalo 3.
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Old 24th March 2015, 08:44 PM   #10
xrk971 is online now xrk971  United States
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Here is a fully digital XO and EQ that is free and every computer has one but there is a catch. It is mono. However, very useful for trying out DSP XO and active speakers for no cost.

Using stereo sound card to create a mono 2 way active crossover

If you get a 4ch soundcard you can do 2 way stereo.
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