What's the difference between fs and fsa? - diyAudio
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Old 20th February 2002, 01:44 AM   #1
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Join Date: Dec 2001
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Default What's the difference between fs and fsa?

* fs : resonant frequency of driver including air load.
* fsa : free air resonant frequency of driver.

I don't know about the difference between fs and fsa.
Is the measurement method different?
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Old 20th February 2002, 03:04 AM   #2
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Default Fs-Fsa

Yes the measurements are diffrent. I suggest you take a look at chapter 8 of Dickason's book if possible. Fs is driver free air resonance and Fsa is the driver resonance with mass (usually clay) attached. The later is used to get the mass of the driver's cone assembly. You can call manufacturer and ask for the later which is simpliest. See pages 155-60 of the Loudspeaker Design Cookbook. Vance Dickason's book is the best $39.95 you can spend of speakers.

Good luck.
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