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Old 24th July 2013, 04:50 PM   #1
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Default Low and hi pass on separate channels

After deciding on a 2 channel amp for my setup, I'm now wondering if the following will be adequate. For one channel, I would like to output low to mid (80hz-5000hz) frequencies and for the other, mid to high (5000hz-20000hz) frequencies.

As this will be a stereo output, does anyone see any issue I would run into with this setup? This will be for a small shelf top unit. I could easily go with 2 full range drivers and be done with it, but this would lack any adequate bass.

Also, if possible, I'm also open to doing a low-mid-high with 3 speakers if possible on a 2 channel amp. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 24th July 2013, 09:43 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lexdiamond20 View Post
After deciding on a 2 channel amp for my setup, I'm now wondering if the following will be adequate. For one channel, I would like to output low to mid (80hz-5000hz) frequencies and for the other, mid to high (5000hz-20000hz) frequencies.
Sounds like you are describing a single biamp channel, Left or Right, take your pick, but not both as required for stereo. For that you need 4 amp channels. Two amps (L&R) for 80-5k and two amps (L&R) for 5k-20k is stereo active biamping. Hope this is what you ment

Quote:
As this will be a stereo output, does anyone see any issue I would run into with this setup?
None that I can see, typical of an active Sub / Sat setup.

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This will be for a small shelf top unit. I could easily go with 2 full range drivers and be done with it, but this would lack any adequate bass.
A 6.5" in a small sealed enclosure (<0.5') with a small tweeter would cover this range with ease.

Quote:
Also, if possible, I'm also open to doing a low-mid-high with 3 speakers if possible on a 2 channel amp. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
A sub could be added either mono or dual stereo or more for bass distribution/flanking subs, etc. Adding one active is the cheapest solution if it already has it's own amp, or using a plate amp with it's own crossover. Dual subs take an additional 2 amp channels, be it their own like a plate amp or part of an ever growing multi channel amp your building or another to stack up
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Old 24th July 2013, 10:43 PM   #3
jReave is offline jReave  Canada
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Maybe I'm understanding this differently then Greebster, but if you are running the amp in stereo and then high passing 1 speaker and low passing the other then I see a big issue.

In stereo, there are different signals going to L & R, so if you only hear 1/2 of 1/2 the total signal and 1/2 of the other 1/2 then, well, you could easily be missing 1/2 the information in the recording.

On the other hand, if you ran the signal in mono then nothing is lost except perhaps imaging and soundstaging. Up on a top shelf, if critical listening is a non-factor then that may not matter much. At 5000Hz and up though, that's just a tweeter in 1 box and the mid/woofer in the other. I'm not sure there's any advantage there over just running 1 speaker, 80-20000Hz, in mono. That would probably entail less material costs too if that's a factor.

Two speakers, 80-20000Hz, in stereo with a sub would be better though.

And that's especially true if you are intending to get any significant SPL out of it/them......
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Old 25th July 2013, 01:37 AM   #4
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Naw I see it that way too, just praying it's not so
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Old 25th July 2013, 01:43 AM   #5
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lexdiamond already has pretty much the same thread going, just broke off to a new one at the end: What type of amp set-up for single 2-way speaker
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Old 25th July 2013, 01:48 AM   #6
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Thanks for the heads up. He's askn for mono
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Old 25th July 2013, 01:58 AM   #7
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Wow, these are both helpful responses guys. To give a bit more info, the actual enclosure will be a vintage radio which originally contained only 1 mono speaker. My only reasoning for wanting to add a second speaker is the amateur audiophile in me assuming ill need 2 for better sound. Although, I just took the unit apart and now realizing 1 speaker may be fine for my needs.

The issue im running into now is how will I run just the one speaker in mono when the input signal coming from my MP3 player is in stereo. But reading Jreave's message above, confirms the only thing I will be losing is imaging and sound-staging; which I'm not too concerned about with such a small unit. The amp I'm using has both a line in connector as well as L/R RCA inputs. Can anyone confirm the stereo input will be output to mono with no major loss besides imaging and sound-staging if using a mono amp.

Thanks in advance
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Old 25th July 2013, 02:14 PM   #8
jReave is offline jReave  Canada
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So you have an amp that takes a stereo input but outputs it to 2 mono outputs, correct?

In that case, if you high pass 1 channel and low pass the other then basically you've just built a single speaker in 2 boxes. That happens all the time. A bit unusual that 1 box is for the tweeter only but not unheard of. But typically the boxes are placed as close as possible to each other to avoid comb filtering. And usually they are 1 on top of the other whereas I suspect you'll be putting them side by each. And usually people use a set of them.

Again, if critical listening is not a major concern, I would think you'll be fine with just 1 set if you can keep them as close as possible to each other. Imaging and soundstaging depend on multiple sound sources reaching our ears, stereo, quad, surround sound, etc., so those are off the table with mono especially 1 speaker in mono.

Given the dimensional constraints you're working with, I would still wonder if using 2 small full range drivers in stereo (or maybe even in mono now that I think about it) wouldn't be a better route to take, especially if you are doing a just-fill-the-room-with-music kind of thing?
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Old 25th July 2013, 04:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jReave View Post
So you have an amp that takes a stereo input but outputs it to 2 mono outputs, correct?

In that case, if you high pass 1 channel and low pass the other then basically you've just built a single speaker in 2 boxes. That happens all the time. A bit unusual that 1 box is for the tweeter only but not unheard of. But typically the boxes are placed as close as possible to each other to avoid comb filtering. And usually they are 1 on top of the other whereas I suspect you'll be putting them side by each. And usually people use a set of them.

Again, if critical listening is not a major concern, I would think you'll be fine with just 1 set if you can keep them as close as possible to each other. Imaging and soundstaging depend on multiple sound sources reaching our ears, stereo, quad, surround sound, etc., so those are off the table with mono especially 1 speaker in mono.

Given the dimensional constraints you're working with, I would still wonder if using 2 small full range drivers in stereo (or maybe even in mono now that I think about it) wouldn't be a better route to take, especially if you are doing a just-fill-the-room-with-music kind of thing?
Thanks for the additional help. After gutting the box last night and realizing speaker placement, I've decided to just go with 2 small full range speakers.
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Old 25th July 2013, 06:23 PM   #10
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Oh no!
Biamping is much-much better.
F.A:S:T. with biamping gives credit to the efficiency factor.
A fullrange -let's say a 3" max for the mids and treble
A woofer ----depends on the box, and I would suggest no more than 6-7".
A coil before the woofer and a capacitor before the broadband driver;
Much easier than going active ( spltting the range before the amplifier).
The L and R inputs shall be paralleled ; and they will be 'feed' by a mono signal
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