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Old 27th November 2003, 06:17 PM   #1
grampi is offline grampi  United States
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Default Building a nice looking sub enclosure

I currently have a DIY sub enclosure which works just fine, but it's an eyesore. It's made out of MDF, which is a great material for building sub enclosures, but it doesn't look good.........it doesn't look like furnature, which is the look I'm after. Obviously, building an enclosure out of solid oak, cherry, or walnut would be prohibitively expensive. I'm thinking the way to go about it is to build the enclosure out of MDF, then cover it with some type of vaneer, plywood, or formica. Having no prior experience with this, any and all suggestions would be highly appreciated. Thanks.
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Old 27th November 2003, 11:19 PM   #2
Ken L is offline Ken L  United States
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Default Re: Building a nice looking sub enclosure

Quote:
Originally posted by grampi
....... cover it with some type of vaneer, plywood, or formica. Having no prior experience with this.......
Generally, a veneer or formica would give the best results, but wiould be very difficult for a novice to execute in a manner that will result in a pretty_ furniture_ look


While you haven't mentioned price range, how much effort you're willing to put in, etc. or how what kind of shape the cabinets are in, etc.

One thing that might be plausible is to prime them, use bondo or wood filler where needed, and sand till smooth, reprime then spray them with lacquer, - resand and respray till you're happy. Or prep and spray with an automotive paint -

I've been thinking about doing something along those lines the next time I need to finish some off.

regards

Ken L
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Old 28th November 2003, 12:18 AM   #3
grampi is offline grampi  United States
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That's pretty much what I did with the one I have now. I sanded it smooth and painted it with a black semi-flat matte finish. What I'd really like to do is make an enclosure to match our oak coffee and end tables. I'd like to make it look like a cabinet with doors on the front (faux, of course). You'd have no idea it was a sub unless you saw the plate amp on the back. I have some wood working skills, but I don't know how much skill it would take to accomplish this. I wouldn't want to spend a ton of money on this either, but I know it's going to cost more than just throwing 6 sides of MDF together. I just need to know the best to go about doing it.
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Old 28th November 2003, 02:21 AM   #4
Wombat2 is offline Wombat2  Australia
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Sorry I don't have a photo (no camera ) but I painted my MDF sub in matt black and didn't like the finish so then gave it 4 or 5 sprayed coats of satin clear lacquer. Give it a great finish with some "depth". It is has 3.5" x3/4" Jarrah trim down each corner that actually project past the bottom edge to form the legs. There is a Jarrah "frame" around the top with approx 18" square of black glass recessed into it. - Makes a nice piece of furniture.

David L
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Old 28th November 2003, 02:25 AM   #5
michael is offline michael  Australia
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use veneered MDF, it is MDF with a real wood veneer already applied, and for the edges of the timber use iron on inch wide wood veneer strips.
with this method just make sure you cut everything nicely, and take you time.
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Old 1st December 2003, 08:16 PM   #6
Schaef is offline Schaef  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by grampi
That's pretty much what I did with the one I have now. I sanded it smooth and painted it with a black semi-flat matte finish. What I'd really like to do is make an enclosure to match our oak coffee and end tables. I'd like to make it look like a cabinet with doors on the front (faux, of course). You'd have no idea it was a sub unless you saw the plate amp on the back. I have some wood working skills, but I don't know how much skill it would take to accomplish this. I wouldn't want to spend a ton of money on this either, but I know it's going to cost more than just throwing 6 sides of MDF together. I just need to know the best to go about doing it.

Okay, what's the problem then? A simple solution to this would be to simply build a very thin outer shell on it (using veneer and 1/2 to 1/4" thick wood) to look like you want out of the wood you want. Are you wanting it to look like a frame and panel construction or something with large solid sides and some doors on the front with a raised or flat panel?

As to skill, it'll take some time and patience to apply the veneer so that it looks good, but if you go the frame and panel route, I can give you some good ideas to hide things so that it looks neater!
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Old 1st December 2003, 09:14 PM   #7
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I made one out of oak plywood.

Tempest Subtable


You might be able to get some pointers from this guy too.
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Old 1st December 2003, 10:12 PM   #8
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I covered my subs with wood grain formica and they came out fine. You have to be careful at the edges so you don't chip the formica because it is so hard and brittle. Look here:
http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showt...161#post142161

The dual 10" drivers are mounted in an old JBL Lancer 77 box. I covered it with 1/4" birch plywood. Then I routed all of the corners for 3/4" square oak. After routing the square stock flush to the plywood sides, I routed them with a 1/4 round bit to radius all of the edges.

Either way is a lot of work, and you'll need to take your time if you're new to wood working, but it was pretty cheap. Plus you can get everything from Home Depot.
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Old 1st December 2003, 10:39 PM   #9
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Grampi,

I'm in the middle of a sub project involving MDF veneered with paper-backed veneer. Pictures of the project can be seen at http://www.audiocircle.com/circles/m...view_album.php

As you will see (assuming the link works), there are no fancy tools involved (other than a router): veneer, wood glue and an iron! Works just fine.

Good luck!
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