I'd like to clone a Dragonfly - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 26th February 2013, 05:11 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Colorado, USA
Default I'd like to clone a Dragonfly

I heard these little speakers at RMAF last fall and fell in love with them: http://www.sound-smith.com/products/...Fi+_review.pdf

Does anybody recognize the drivers? All I know about the crossovers is that they are "phase correct" whatever that means. The fuse lamp behind the grille that tells you you are about to blow up the tweeter is pretty ingenious. I'm sure before it blows the resistance goes way up, so the loss of highs before it actually blows is another clue you're about to fry your expensive tweets. Any info would be appreciated.
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th February 2013, 06:02 PM   #2
adason is offline adason  United States
diyAudio Member
 
adason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Maryland
I do not like that lamp/fuse on the front
it looks you can hit and break it anytime
no cover on it is just asking for trouble

btw bose did these lamps 30 years ago!
nothing new...nothing ingenious
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th February 2013, 07:03 PM   #3
frugal-phile(tm)
diyAudio Moderator
 
planet10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Victoria, BC, NA, Sol III
Blog Entries: 5
Looks like a Davis mid-bass. I'm with adason on the external fuse, besides his objections they will be a diffraction object.

And why didn't they use screws with proper heads???

dave
__________________
community sites t-linespeakers.org, frugal-horn.com, frugal-phile.com ........ commercial site planet10-HiFi
p10-hifi forum here at diyA
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th February 2013, 08:50 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
If you like that design, you might consider also my Jordan with a ribbon mini-monitor or mass loaded transmissioin line (MLTL). The mini-monitor's thread on DIYAudio started back in 2005 at:

Crossing Over Jordan

and later the MLTL thread is at:

Jordan with a Ribbon MLTL

Many of the mini-monitor links are dead but if you are interested, please contact me.

The Jordan with a ribbon mini-monitor and MLTL designs use the same crossover and the Jordan JX92S (Jordan's US Distributor for EAD Full Range Drivers) and Aurum Cantus G2si (Parts Express: the #1 source for audio, video & speaker building components) drivers which are still available for a total cost of $600. Both designs have been duplicated by numerous others.

Jim
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th February 2013, 09:14 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
vinylkid58's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Victoria, B.C.
Quote:
Originally Posted by planet10 View Post
And why didn't they use screws with proper heads???
+1. Looks wrong.

jeff
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th February 2013, 02:46 AM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Colorado, USA
I thought the same thing about the screwey screws. The ones ast the show had that worked out. Which Bose model used fuse lamps in series with the tweeter? Any guesses on the tweeter?
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th February 2013, 02:54 AM   #7
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
kevinkr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Blog Entries: 6
Almost every unpowered Bose speaker used fuses in series with the tweeter.. It's been a long time, but I expect most of the current ones still do.
__________________
"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence." - Carl Sagan
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th February 2013, 03:27 AM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Colorado, USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinkr View Post
Almost every unpowered Bose speaker used fuses in series with the tweeter.. It's been a long time, but I expect most of the current ones still do.
This is a fuse lamp, not a fuse. A fuse lamp looks like a fuse, but is actually a lamp. It starts to glow when the power is getting dangerously high, alerting the listener that he should back off on the volume. Secondly, just like any other incandescent bulb (or any conductor, including voice coils BTW) the resistance goes up as the temperature increases, offering a second level of protection. The third level of protection is the same as a conventional fuse, it opens up, breaking the circuit to the tweeter.

These lamps were used in vintage tuners and receivers receivers for dial lights, but I don't believe they've ever been used in exactly this manner before in a speaker. I do know that many vintage speakers used incandescent bulb in the internal crossover for the increasing resistance protection scheme, but did offer the visual feedback or the fuse style protection.

But that's not what I care about, these speakers SOUND absolutely wonderful, better than all but a few megabuck speakers at the show.

Last edited by audiomagnate; 27th February 2013 at 03:34 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th February 2013, 03:39 AM   #9
adason is offline adason  United States
diyAudio Member
 
adason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Maryland
"These lamps were used in vintage tuners and receivers receivers for dial lights, but I don't believe they've ever been used in exactly this manner before in a speaker."

I personaly took few of them out of old Bose speakers...you are not listening what people tell you, it has been used extensively in 70ties and 80ties

McIntosh used these often too...this is from Roger Russell's page:

Red and yellow indicator lights were mounted in the front of the bass cabinet at the bottom right. The yellow light was connected directly to the system input. It became visible when the input to the system approached rated power. It served only as a warning indicator. If the system was driven excessively hard, the main fuse would blow. If the system continued to be driven after the fuse blew, the yellow light would still be seen but no sound would be heard. The red light was connected directly across the tweeter fuse. It could only be seen if the high frequency fuse blew and the system continued to be driven at high power. Protection circuits were included for the lights.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th February 2013, 01:30 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Colorado, USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by planet10 View Post
Looks like a Davis mid-bass. I'm with adason on the external fuse, besides his objections they will be a diffraction object.

And why didn't they use screws with proper heads???

dave
Thanks Dave, good call on the Davis. It looks like he's added some sort of yellow "dope." Any guesses on what that is or the tweeter ID?

Davis 13mp5g 5" Graphite Midbass 297-562

Too bad it's NLA from PE.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
AudioQuest Dragonfly DAC steve jones Digital Line Level 12 3rd July 2013 03:18 AM
Battery Power - USB DAC (Dragonfly) seawalker Digital Line Level 11 30th October 2012 01:15 AM
Clone reteP2k Tubes / Valves 3 31st December 2011 06:01 PM
clone AN/K ccopp Multi-Way 0 9th July 2006 09:24 AM
Question regarding ProAc 2.5 Clone and Tempo 2 Clone zoooh Multi-Way 5 11th March 2003 09:19 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 04:11 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2