Could I use solid wood like walnut to construct my cabinet? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11th February 2013, 11:59 AM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Lightbulb Could I use solid wood like walnut to construct my cabinet?

I've read lots of topics regarding solid wood for cabinets but still confused.

1. It's said solid wood is easy to warp, well I have build all my furnitures with oak and walnut, so I do have some experience on that and I know it's really ugly when wood warps. But if you age your wood for say one year or more, and if you live in a fairly stable moisture enviroment, I guess it won't be a huge problem, you just have to seal the wood with enough layers of finish, and becareful with the grain orientation.

2. They say solid wood have different acoustic response. Well that's something I really don't know, I'd appreciate some real life experience

Btw I'd like to use walnut or oak(red/white?), or is there a better choice?
I'd like to build a whole 9.2 system( the "9" part): 2 floor standing, 6 small ones and 1 center.

Well I'd be grateful if anyone could suggest some full designs too(I know I shoud only use mature designs at my knowledge level instead of mess it around by myself)

Thanks in advance!
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 04:00 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
speaker dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: The Mountain, Framingham
Solid wood is seldom used in commercial designs because its just too expensive. I have also always heard the issue about warpage, but that could probably be surmounted with the right wood and aging. I am familiar with piano construction and keys and hammers are made with solid wood (but I have seen hammers warp). I also remember a video on piano construction where they took a large board of solid wood and cut it into 1" wide strips. Each strip was turned 90 degrees and then they were all glued back together, kind of a butcher block approach. This was said to give them long term stability.

Still, in the end solid wood tends to be lighter and higher Q than most veneered MDF. As such it is a slightly inferior material to use, so I wouldn't be real excited about paying a lot more for inferior results.

David S.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 04:13 PM   #3
puppet is offline puppet  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: The Dells, WI
Speaking as a cabinetmaker, the logistics of a solid wood cabinet can be overcome. From the standpoint of what speaker dave has illustrated ... not so much. It's hard to defeat woods inherent sound characteristics ... ie its lack of consistency piece to piece.

There is however the alternative of a frame/panel construction which could open up a wide variety of panel configurations and construction techniques to address the various points made by speaker dave. Best of both worlds perhaps.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 04:32 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Josephjcole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Is a higher Q, lighter weight material inherently inferior? I would think that a higher Q material would be easier to damp with bracing... but I'm not really an expert in the field.

Either way I would consider a frame and panel construction as puppet recommends. I've never found warping to be a problem when building solid wood cabinets, but I've certainly had trouble with expansion and contraction. Both in opening up joints over time and in trying to screw a drivers frame to a expanding/shrinking piece of wood. Something will give eventually.... so this needs to be addressed. Either an over sized hole in the baffle with bolts, or frame and panel with a plywood panel.

Joe
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 05:06 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Oregon City, Oregon
Default Cabinet damping

Actually, bracing doesn't "damp" vibrations at all. Bracing does raise the resonant frequency and raise the "Q". If you can get the resonant points out of the band that the cabinet is expected to work over, then that's good. Bracing a subwoofer is good, Bracing a midrange isn't typically very successful...

De-coupling drivers from cabinets helps, as does increasing the mass of the panels with damping panels such as asphalt pads, etc. helps, too.

Last edited by jplesset; 11th February 2013 at 05:07 PM. Reason: spelling
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 05:22 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
speaker dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: The Mountain, Framingham
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josephjcole View Post
Is a higher Q, lighter weight material inherently inferior? I would think that a higher Q material would be easier to damp with bracing... but I'm not really an expert in the field.

Joe
You are half right. Lighter is actually good if you intend to add damping as the damping to mass ratio can be better. Higher Q generally means less internal loss and so more loss needs to be added to get to low output at each resonance.

I agree with Jplesset about bracing vs. damping, etc.

David S.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 06:14 PM   #7
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brighton UK
Hi, Zaph|Audio - ZA5 Speaker Designs with ZA14W08 woofer and Vifa DQ25SC16-04 tweeter, rgds, sreten.
__________________
There is nothing so practical as a really good theory - Ludwig Boltzmann
When your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail - Abraham Maslow
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 06:39 PM   #8
tinitus is offline tinitus  Europe
diyAudio Moderator R.I.P.
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
I used real wood in a big bass guitar horn I built
ok, softer pine or spruce wood
some part of it were plywood or MDF
whatever I could find

made some real weird crack sounds sometimes
nah, I won't do that again

but I guess the box corners could be real beautiful with that wood
I think you may find other speaker designs with that
there are several ways to do it, and some look better than others
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 07:06 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
speaker dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: The Mountain, Framingham
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinitus View Post
I used real wood in a big bass guitar horn I built
ok, softer pine or spruce wood
some part of it were plywood or MDF
whatever I could find

made some real weird crack sounds sometimes
nah, I won't do that again
I was sitting next to a large subwoofer once when it let out a big CRACK.

Sounded like a gunshot. I nearly had a heart attack.

It was a split that ran down one side and up another edge. It was an MDF cabinet but with solid corners to join the panels and allow for a nice looking radius.

It was mid winter in Binghamton and probably pretty dry.

David S.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2013, 08:13 PM   #10
evanc is offline evanc  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: New Jersey. About 1 hour from NYC and 1 min. from the beach
You need to think about expansion and contraction. Wood grows across the grain when the humidity goes up, and shrinks back when the air is drier. You can't stop it. Try this.... solid wood sides top and bottom with the grain going around the box. Then use plywood or MDF for the front and back. This avoids grain conflict.
Evan
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSC01237.JPG (143.8 KB, 222 views)
File Type: jpg DSC01243.JPG (128.5 KB, 218 views)
__________________
http://www.evancotler.com
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Solid walnut Domus resto hkingman Multi-Way 9 3rd October 2011 04:46 AM
Solid walnut subwoofers project Village Plank Subwoofers 30 20th September 2010 01:11 PM
Fisher 500C Receiver $400 Walnut Cabinet, New Output Tubes Scott Novak Swap Meet 1 16th August 2009 07:16 PM
Walnut for other wood Phergus_25 Swap Meet 0 27th February 2007 03:03 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 06:53 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2