Could I use solid wood like walnut to construct my cabinet? - Page 2 - diyAudio
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Old 12th February 2013, 03:27 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evanc View Post
You need to think about expansion and contraction. Wood grows across the grain when the humidity goes up, and shrinks back when the air is drier. You can't stop it. Try this.... solid wood sides top and bottom with the grain going around the box. Then use plywood or MDF for the front and back. This avoids grain conflict.
Evan
Yep exactly, that's what I would do, and if front/back panel were attached with bigger screw holes like tabletops, I can use solid wood too, just need to balance--not too loose to vibrate, nor too tight to crack
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Old 12th February 2013, 03:31 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by puppet View Post
Speaking as a cabinetmaker, the logistics of a solid wood cabinet can be overcome. From the standpoint of what speaker dave has illustrated ... not so much. It's hard to defeat woods inherent sound characteristics ... ie its lack of consistency piece to piece.

There is however the alternative of a frame/panel construction which could open up a wide variety of panel configurations and construction techniques to address the various points made by speaker dave. Best of both worlds perhaps.
Frame and panel? Do you mean like furniture? I do use frame and panel for my pie-safe side panels, but for cabinet? I don't know how to prevent the panel from vibrating, and I think it would be very hard to make it air tight.Or is it a totally different method than furniture?
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Old 12th February 2013, 06:39 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by dustblue View Post
Frame and panel? Do you mean like furniture? I do use frame and panel for my pie-safe side panels, but for cabinet? I don't know how to prevent the panel from vibrating, and I think it would be very hard to make it air tight.Or is it a totally different method than furniture?
Yep ... typical frame and panel affair. Think outside the box for a minute.
1. Forget about trapping the panel in a groove. Think rabbit for the panel to flush up against.

2. Anything as simple as a wood toggle can hold the panel in place from the back side. Make the panel oversized ... rabbit it over the frames back side and screw it off. A bead of sealant around the panel to the frame (inside now) completes the seal and vibration concerns.

3. The panel can be made out of anything ... veneered plywood (1/4") laminated to another blank with damping in between (felt, vinyl, etc). You'd have to fabricate a simple cold press to laminate the panels. Clamping between a few sheets of 3/4" plywood should work just fine. Panels like this won't shrink away from the frame. I've made panels using solid stock resawn to 1/4" or under. Lay them up the same way ... access to a widebelt sander is almost mandatory though. If you do something like this any number of designs can be expressed in the lay up. Booked pieces ... diamond patterns with a figured border. Use your imagination.

4. The exterior of the cabinet can have the panel flush with the frame. Just rabbit the panel to overcome the rabbited frame. Put a 1/32" x 1/32" quirk around the panel so you don't have to worry about the surfaces being exactly perfect ... you'd more that likely sand through a face veneer trying. ... or set the panel back just that much. If your frame has a profile like some cutters will produce and that what you want .. set the panel as it would normally sit. All you need to do is accommodate the back side of the panel (inside the case).
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Old 12th February 2013, 06:55 AM   #14
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Got ya. So it is frame and panel but not floating panel, and that's why I cant use solid wood for the panel part...cold press plywood by myself sounds interesting but it's really hard, beyond my capability...In fact if we use plywood for the cabinet then we can just use plywood, why the frame?

Thank you for your help anyway! Very inspiriting!
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Old 12th February 2013, 01:59 PM   #15
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If gluing and clamping is beyond your capability, I think I'm done here.
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Old 12th February 2013, 02:59 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by puppet View Post
If gluing and clamping is beyond your capability, I think I'm done here.
Nah it's not like what you think. For example making 40"*20"*1" plywood from oak, you have to resaw 5"wide 4/4thick oak into at least 1"/4 thick, combine 4 of them along the grain, then combine 8 5"*20"*1"/4 along the grain, and press the 2 together(so the grain between layers are perpendicular, make sense?), then do it all over again and glue what you got together at last.

The problem is, if you use clamps instead of a industry-level cold press machine, you'll never get a usable flat board, it would be warped, twisted, and and there would be plenty of void in between those layers.

And honestly I don't think 1/4 thick is thin enough. Think about the extra labor, besides I don't have a industry-level cold press machine.
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Old 12th February 2013, 06:17 PM   #17
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I made my subs more than 12 years ago and they are doing fine. The outer shell is made out of panels of beec (rods) donīt know the english word for it.

As a precaution I varnished the inside of the panels and sanded them slightly.
I made a constraint layer using a water emulsion damping glue. I used a lot of clamps and weights to press the wood sheets to a MDF layer. I drilled some holes to put nails into aligning them while the glue settled. Of course I even used stuff to conserve the distance between the wood and MDF panels.

In addition I used plywood, granite, aluminium bars and some other materials. I had been unable to construct the subs if I had not gained access to a workshop where I once worked at.

I think the key elements in doing something different is a lot of planning and much time to solve the unaviodable problems or challanges one encounter.

(BTW Puppet, the rabbit confused me, I think you ment rabbet).
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Old 12th February 2013, 09:39 PM   #18
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I would be wary of using whole-cabinet construction with solid wood due to possible warping, as you said. But solid wood makes great front baffle when backed with MDF. Mine had been for few months with no problems whatsoever.

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Old 12th February 2013, 10:41 PM   #19
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All solid. All small. One has had to have adjustments made due to aging.

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Old 13th February 2013, 03:47 AM   #20
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2x12 pine: Le Page carpenter's glue, Le Page PL premium construction adhesive, 3/16'' thick screws for wood.
1/4'' birch ply on top: Le Page carpenter's glue, 18-gauge brad nails.
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