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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

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Old 6th February 2013, 02:56 PM   #61
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No, but I stopped upon discovering an 'Introduction to Me' pdf.

Last edited by Scottmoose; 6th February 2013 at 02:59 PM.
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Old 6th February 2013, 03:26 PM   #62
lolo is offline lolo  France
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same here.. craps!
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Old 6th February 2013, 06:18 PM   #63
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I signed up for the free book (why not?) which comes in weekly emails. So far, it has not gotten past the equal-loudness-contour talk. The author is actually discussing it as if the goal is to have an inverse of the equal-loudness curves, effectively changing the ear's response to flat. I hope the error in logic there is obvious to most people?

Of course, there is often good reason to drop response a little in the sensitive areas, whether in regard to power response / reflected sound balance, the expected volume level of the speaker in use, or simply a bit of general "voicing" to the on-axis response. I am told these articles eventually reach a specific speaker design. I have some guesses on why it might sound relatively normal in practice, and they don't involve any "beating", but I'll just wait and see what it is .
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Old 6th February 2013, 08:48 PM   #64
diceman is offline diceman  United Kingdom
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I signed up as well and have, today, been emailed the second free book.

The equal loudness contour is indeed inverted to provide a target speaker freq response to obtain a "flat" response after ear processing.

I have no problem with the theory that a big mid-range dip will help to mask a whole heap of nasties and to the average punter is what they are after - it has no place in high-end audio IMHO.

The author seems to have a taken a nugget of information and based a whole heap of research and marketing on a miss-understanding from what I can see. Maybe there is a hidden nugget of information he has yet to impart that makes it all have an element of sense but so far it is going down the route I expected :-(

To be fair when you look at the variance in equal loudness contours of a number of individuals a few dB here and there is of little consequence IMHO.

Last edited by diceman; 6th February 2013 at 08:54 PM.
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Old 30th May 2013, 06:29 PM   #65
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If you think trying to record/re-produce a piano is difficult try recording a good violin. This is the one instrument which has NO fundamental frequency - ONLY harmonics.
P.S. IAN
This blending/mixing of frequencies is called hetrodyning.
Regards.
The Sound Man
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