High-efficiency, wide-range midrange? - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 14th January 2013, 05:12 PM   #11
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Pensacola, Florida
Default McCauley 6326

Quote:
Originally Posted by rongon View Post
Is there such a thing as a driver with about 95dB/1W/1m sensitivity, that can be run from about 300Hz to 8kHz or higher?

Maybe a high efficiency "full-range" that doesn't make bass, that could be used with a supertweeter?

--
Recommend that you limit bandwidth to only slightly more than a decade. Here is a candidate that will outshine most in this mission. If your application is not PA then this recommendation will, of course, be overkill.

Regards,

WHG


Speaker City sells speakers, drivers, audiophile loud: 10 in. woofer 300 watts RMS
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2013, 05:49 PM   #12
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: MN
Quote:
Originally Posted by rongon View Post
Hmmm... Well, my interest is in getting the crossovers as far away from the voice range as possible.
If that's your interest, then you have the wrong target. Voice fundamental notes fall around 80-400Hz, so you're right in the thick of it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2013, 06:03 PM   #13
cotdt is offline cotdt  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Send a message via AIM to cotdt
I agree, 80-400Hz is more like it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2013, 06:15 PM   #14
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: MN
Btw, I was giving the speech range to make my point about 300Hz. You need to get up to 1100-1600Hz to cover all the fundamentals for singing, and then there's arguments to be made for the harmonics. The point is, when we're talking about low crossovers, middle C is 260Hz, so for singing or speech or even most music in general, 300Hz is right in the middle of things. Whether this matters is a different discussion, but if the goal is to get crossovers out of the way, typical large 3-way points do the opposite.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2013, 07:50 PM   #15
tsiros is offline tsiros  Greece
diyAudio Member
 
tsiros's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Patra, Greece
Send a message via MSN to tsiros Send a message via Skype™ to tsiros
400 Hz is the fundamental. the harmonics can go above 5 KHz.

edit: didn't word it very well. I wanted to complement dumptruck's information.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2013, 08:15 PM   #16
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by whgeiger View Post
Recommend that you limit bandwidth to only slightly more than a decade. Here is a candidate that will outshine most in this mission. If your application is not PA then this recommendation will, of course, be overkill.

Regards,

WHG
I agree, 300-3000 or a bit more is a good goal.
That said, I'm using a pair of Eminence Alpha 6 in PA use from 100 Hz to 3500 Hz, (an APT tweeter above) and have been very pleased with their vocal reproduction even at 125 dB levels at one meter.
The Alpha 6 is 95 dB one watt one meter. Costs a very small fraction of the McCaully 10".

Here is the response of one in a small sealed box, some of the ripple around 2K may be diffraction as the box has a deep recess to fit the grill:
Attached Images
File Type: png Screen Shot 2013-01-14 at 2.01.45 PM.png (156.4 KB, 232 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2013, 08:19 PM   #17
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Calgary on the Bow
if the op has the room a horn and compression driver would easily cover the desired range and with directivity and much lower distortion. You can have almost everything on one horn. If her were to go with a Lowther and a large horn he can obtain extension to below 200 Hz to 20 KHz with one driver and with far greater efficiency than with a standard dynamic driver. Just some possible options. Best regards Moray James.
__________________
moray james
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2013, 08:32 PM   #18
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Orlando, FLA
I've wanted to try this for a while:

RCF L8S800 8" Midbass Speaker 294-828

Will be pushing it to even make it to 3KHz.

Another good choice already mentioned is the 18 Sound 6ND430, but once again, 3KHz max. I tested it out and liked the results, but ultimately choose the BG Neo10 doubled up per side.

Greg
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2013, 11:40 PM   #19
diyAudio Member
 
5th element's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: England
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsiros View Post
400 Hz is the fundamental. the harmonics can go above 5 KHz.

edit: didn't word it very well. I wanted to complement dumptruck's information.
The fundamental of a soprano high C is a little over 1kHz, with the top coloratura pieces reaching around 1.5kHz, obviously you then get harmonics at multiples of this. Harmonics up to 10kHz wouldn't be a surprise, but usually the 2nd and 3rd are far more pronounced when singing that high up. So that lands you above 4kHz.

Going down, a tenor low C is around 125Hz, with bass voice extending nearly one octave more.

To cover all of the voice with one driver you really need 80-10kHz, this is an absurd goal and mostly prohibitive. The reason why you want to get the xover out of the 1-3kHz region is because the ear is the most sensitive here and if you're xover is poorly implemented then it will stick out less than if it was poorly implemented and at 5kHz.

If you want to place the xover high then you need a driver of small diameter, otherwise you're going to be sacrificing the off axis behaviour for the high xover point. If you want high sensitivity too then your midrange driver isn't going to be able to go that low.

Personally if crossing at around 4-5kHz, I would rather use a small mid and cross it closer to 5-800Hz and maintain the off axis. The audax HM100Z0 is about the only hifi driver I know of that will work from 400Hz-4kHz with decent sensitivity and it happens to sound very nice. Obviously if you go pro that's another kettle of fish as those drivers tend to be larger, and if crossed high you will be sacrificing the off axis.
__________________
What the hell are you screamin' for? Every five minutes there's a bomb or somethin'! I'm leavin! bzzzz!
  Reply With Quote
Old 15th January 2013, 12:23 AM   #20
tsiros is offline tsiros  Greece
diyAudio Member
 
tsiros's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Patra, Greece
Send a message via MSN to tsiros Send a message via Skype™ to tsiros
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5th element View Post
To cover all of the voice with one driver you really need 80-10kHz, this is an absurd goal and mostly prohibitive.
plenty of 8" drivers do that (fostex, lowther, audionirvana, seas) , not sure if there are other constraints implied here.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Using 12" guitar element as high efficiency midrange? Elias Multi-Way 53 30th June 2014 02:23 AM
High efficiency 12 inch midrange - recommendations? hasselbaink Multi-Way 13 8th March 2013 11:23 PM
looking for recommendation for high efficiency midrange for open baffle hum4god Multi-Way 14 14th January 2011 08:04 PM
Power supply:Universal AC input/ Full range,High Efficiency, and High reliability hang Vendor's Bazaar 12 24th July 2009 03:46 AM
high efficiency midrange tsmith1315 Car Audio 15 15th March 2009 11:02 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:08 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2