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Old 27th December 2012, 01:03 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VaNarn View Post
For passive circuits,a parallel second order crossover is a better choice if the issues of phase and signal summation are not a priority.The reason for this is that the high frequency driver receives some damping via the falling impedance of the parallel connected inductor in the crossover region and below.
IMO this is only marginally helpful if the resonance frequency of the high frequency driver is fairly close to the cross-over frequency. Electrical damping is relevant only in the band of frequencies close to the resonant frequency of the driver. At frequencies well above resonance, the driver is mass controlled.

Best Regards,
Pete
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Old 27th December 2012, 03:14 AM   #12
VaNarn is offline VaNarn  Australia
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Hi,Pete,I have always followed guidelines when choosing a crossover point for a tweeter and I certainly would not contemplate trying to use a tweeter with a resonance close to that frequency.Generally with dome tweeters,I look for the area where the impedance is at its lowest and the phase zero.This is typically around 3 kHz for 25 mm domes.The excursion is part of the consideration in the xover selection,particularly at high SPL's,because as you attempt to go lower a greater movement of the diaphragm occurs ( ka point).For a 12 dB/octave network this means that the resonance should be chosen to be less than 1.5 kHz.Things are tougher for first order xovers and a more robust tweeter with an Fs of 750 Hz should be used.In this latter case a quasi 2nd order( a modified 1st order series network) is a good choice and it does benefit from a tweeter offset to correct its' lobing pattern. For compression drivers (horns) crossover choice is far more difficult as the(L.F.!) resonance is often close to the desired point and the impedance and phase can fluctuate a great deal.
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Old 28th December 2012, 03:57 AM   #13
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VaNarn,

I certainly agree with everything that you say in your post #12. In my previous post, I wasn't suggesting that the resonance and crossover frequencies of a driver should be close together, I do understand that that should be avoided whenever possible. My post was meant to address the conventional understanding (misunderstanding IMO) that electrical damping of the driver is important throughout the operating frequency range of the driver, including in the range that is greater than about 3 times the resonance frequency of the driver. This is supposedly one of the evils of passive crossover networks that active crossing over "cures" effecting an amazing (subjective) improvement in reproduction. -Not that I don't see advantages to active.

Regards,
Pete
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