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Old 14th October 2012, 11:52 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pano View Post
I would say:

1: Yes
2: Yes
3: The sound of what?
4: No
3. A more normal tweeter such as dome or ribbon in the high octave. From what i read, that is suppose to be the advantage, no reflections from sidewalls.

4. Compared to a normal compression driver with a proper horn. The coax will depend on the whizzer cone as the horn so it will be limited in its optimisation. Correct/incorrect?
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Old 14th October 2012, 01:20 PM   #12
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A coax usually does not have a whizzer cone.
They either rely on the woofer cone as a horn extension a la Tannoy or have a fixed horn protruding a la Altec.
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Old 14th October 2012, 03:01 PM   #13
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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Yep, what Charles said.
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Old 14th October 2012, 06:33 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oon_the_kid View Post
Thank you for all the lengthy replies. Will take me a bit of time to digest everything. Could i summarise everything into a few sentence

1. Sound quality could have quite a bit of variaance. Depending on well the horn was designed.
As well as the crossover.

Quote:
2. A 2 inch compression driver is unlikely to work well in the very high frequency region ..as a supertweeter of sorts. Really needs a much smaller one.
A 15" mid does not want a supertweeter, it wants a mid tweeter. Regardless of hype from the full range crowd, taking it far above 1khz is a hit to fidelity. A supertweeter would compliment a 2" exit CD better than it would compliment a 15" full range.

Quote:
3. The sound will be highly directional rather than dispersed.
Normally coaxial cones act as 120 to 80 degree conical horns with a constant beamwidth. It's directional, yes.

Quote:
4. Unlikely the compression driver in a coax will sound good because of the lack of control over the size and shape of the horn.
A large format conical horn ain't bad at all. There are some tradeoffs but a good concentric coaxial can sound phenominal. The Soundfield Audio 1812 Overture comes to mind.
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Old 15th October 2012, 03:39 PM   #15
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Default Nota Bene

The Audio Nirvana 'Super 15 Coax is a Tri-Axial, Hybrid Full-Range Driver

Low Frequencies:
are reproduced by a Large Cone decoupled from the Voice Coil at Mid Frequencies by a Compliance (mechanical crossover).

Mid & Low Frequencies as well:
are reproduced by a Whizzer Cone, directly attached to the Voice Coil.
Mass of the Large Whizzer and Voice Coil, rolls-off the highs.

High Frequencies:
are reproduced by a Separate, Coaxially Mounted Super Tweeter, that is protected by a Series Capacitor.

From CommonSense Audio the following description is provided:
Audio Nirvana Full-Range Speakers For Sale. High Efficiency, DIY, Single Driver, Monitor Speakers with no crossover.

“The Audio Nirvana 'Super 15 Coax' ($698/pr) has a frequency response from 26 Hz to 25,000 Hz. You can expect at least 99 db efficiency when installed in any of our cabinets. It handles 70 watts continuous RMS (normal listening level will be about 1/10 watt). Impedance is 8 ohms. Voice coil is 2.0 inches (50 mm) for the woofer and 1.5 inches (38 mm) for the tweeter. Magnet weight is 4.3 lbs (woofer) and 4 oz (tweeter). Total weight is 19 lbs. The woofer cone is made of paper. The surround is accordion style and made of treated cloth. The frame is cast aluminum. There are separate terminals for the woofer and the tweeter so the speakers can be biwired, if desired. This speaker is more properly called a 'triaxial' because it has a whizzer cone for midrange information. The best classic coaxial drivers were also triaxials.”

Regards,

WHG

Last edited by whgeiger; 15th October 2012 at 03:55 PM. Reason: technical correction
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Old 15th October 2012, 03:58 PM   #16
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Interesting!

Wonder if there are any frequency and distortion curves available anywhere.
Personally I do not like whizzer cones but it'd still be interesting.
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Old 15th October 2012, 07:17 PM   #17
tinitus is offline tinitus  Europe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Darwin View Post
....... and distortion curves available anywhere.
I only know of Beyma showing distortion curves
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Old 15th October 2012, 09:04 PM   #18
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And I give them great credit for that but it does not have to be supplied by the manufacturer to make me a happy bunny!
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Old 16th October 2012, 06:23 AM   #19
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Default Grist...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Darwin View Post
Interesting!

Wonder if there are any frequency and distortion curves available anywhere.
Personally I do not like whizzer cones but it'd still be interesting.
... for the Audio Nivana mill.

1) This project, with frequency plot, uses the 15 Driver sans Separate Tweeter.

review33.com - ????

2) 15" Coax Coax Driver spec. sheet with frequency plots
Attached Images
File Type: jpg an15coaxspecs.jpg (184.2 KB, 155 views)
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Old 16th October 2012, 06:58 AM   #20
HiroPro is offline HiroPro  Canada
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As a kit builder DIYer for a few short years I have to say I have yet to use a full range wizer or coaxial because the published FRs are always so ragged from 2k to 6k and they fall off a cliff generally at 14k.

I can understand the point source addiction though as I've only recently come to understand/appreciate this after hearing some Danley labs. Combing and phase issues in multiways is more pronounced than most of us realize.

I find it interesting that so many old timer experts and gurus go to full range driver/coaxials in horns with BVR cabs etc.

There has gotta be something to it if these purists are into it!

Watching Don Keele's CBT address at Boston IEEE and his acoustic models it really hit home how detrimental these affects can be to a loudspeaker system.

Synergy horn is an interesting solution but I really like what CBT does in this regard scientifically.

Last edited by HiroPro; 16th October 2012 at 07:05 AM.
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