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Old 9th October 2012, 08:44 AM   #11
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haha at last some that wont hex me for contemplating solid wood construction! I have a few woodworking books, and shrinkage is something that anyone in possession of a lathe or fretsaw should know, i have neither but was still aware of it.
Well seasoned, close grained wood is the least problematic, hence my initial choice of birch and beech. Apple may look nicer.

Any suggestions that fit those criteria are welcome, however stating what should be obvious to anyone handling real wood, is not necessary. If i was that naive id be building in pine or oak...
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Old 9th October 2012, 08:51 AM   #12
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...For furniture work would must be down to 9/10% moisture so it can take the conditions of being put into someones house in winter with central heating.

If you were to purchase some wood, cut it roughly to size, stack it up with air gaps behind your sofa or in the room it is to be used to let it acclimatise for a few months, there would be very little movement.

For a little more money to ensure less movement, make sure you buy quarter sawn timber.

American timber is often a lot dryer than english, and you get less wastage, but I think any solid hardwood, would work fine, just depends what colour and grain you want in your house.

Whats wrong with Oak?
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Old 9th October 2012, 09:02 AM   #13
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There is nothing wrong with Oak, besides that i dont like it and i think im correct in saying it has an open coarse grain which could be more prone to splitting.
I agree also, quartersawn with a period of acclimatisation will make double sure. I had to do the same with birch ply!
Also for what its worth, i plan to build and glue. Leave for several weeks, then varnish or seal both the inside and outside surfaces to further protect against movement.
So far ive considered birch and beech (tough and workable) and cherry and apple or mahogany (for appearance).
Purpleheart would be nice but i doubt ill find it in a form i can easily work with.
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Old 9th October 2012, 09:12 AM   #14
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I resaw my own 1/4" veneer from solid and glue it on casework made from ply and mdf...Good Luck with solid wood. Seal it inside and out.

Of the woods you mention above, apple has the greatest change in dimension with moisture...beech is not far behind..That characteristic is not good for your purpose.

Last edited by Ed LaFontaine; 9th October 2012 at 09:16 AM.
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Old 9th October 2012, 09:19 AM   #15
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Thanks Ed, thats the sort of info that i didnt have. Maybe the apple or beech deserves a re-think.
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Old 9th October 2012, 10:17 AM   #16
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It is a matter of moisture content swing between seasons and wood selection / milling. Some woods are more stable then others and the within a species the type of milling matters as well. Quartersawn will move th least and be the most stable with flat sawn having the opposite effect.

There is a chart out there on the web from the forestry service I believe that shows various species and their seasonal movement as a function of moisture content and panel width...check it out.
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Old 9th October 2012, 10:17 AM   #17
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This one may help
http://workshoppages.com/WS/Articles...ent-Charts.pdf
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Old 9th October 2012, 10:22 AM   #18
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Obeche
Merbau
Mahogany

These are some which have the lowest moisture shrinkage from living tree to fully dried...
So should be quite stable in different humidity conditions inside the house...

Teak is not completely bad choise either.
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Old 9th October 2012, 10:33 AM   #19
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Why not do like prairieboy suggested and use solid for sides top and bottom with the grain running around the cabinet, and use plywood for the front and rear baffle. You could paint the plywood satin black.....it's a nice look and no grain conflict. There are a pair of micro towers I made this way in the cabinet section of my web site.
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Old 9th October 2012, 10:55 AM   #20
palmas is offline palmas  Portugal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Studio Au View Post
I made these speakers for a pair of Mark Audio Alpair 7.3's

They are 'solid engineered' Walnut.

Click the image to open in full size.

They are infact made from engineered floorboards...it comes as 5mm thick solid wood, bonded to 12mm plywood. I then glued this to 6mm mdf to ensure it had a solid base to work from, and power sanded the top finish off making them perfectly flat.

I bought these off-cuts for 20, and have a speaker that has the external walls made of solid wood, a plywood central core and the deadening inside of mdf.

I think for me it is the perfect speaker building material....so far
great suggestion, I'll try it next project! I use MDF for basic box, OSB for structure and reenforcements and on the outside I use 1" ikea kitchen tops or 7mm moisture resistante HDF so I can paint easily.
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