Wattage Required for Equal Output at All Frequencies - Page 7 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 26th September 2012, 10:13 PM   #61
DrDyna is offline DrDyna  United States
diyAudio Member
 
DrDyna's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Blog Entries: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pano View Post
Could be, but this is off CD. Wonder if the FFT shows dynamics as subsonics? Certainly there can be level changes over long periods.
Well, I say that because I've seen some albums, even on cd where the bass driver is flopping all over the place and it has nothing to do with the recording.
__________________
The best video in the world.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2012, 07:43 PM   #62
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pano View Post
That may be a function of the FFT window. Let me see if I can fix that.
Same song -262144 samples. I would guess the response below ~20 is bogus. (or is it?)
I'd agree.
The "flat line" nature of the trace below what appears to be whatever musical genre's LF roll off point does not look consistent with music.

Some VLF garbage from air handling systems etc. makes it's way on to some recordings (and local TV news announcers, seems there are "engineers" without a clue about using HP filters) but with good engineers like Pink Floyd employs to not clean up that mess seems unlikely.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th September 2012, 10:01 PM   #63
DrDyna is offline DrDyna  United States
diyAudio Member
 
DrDyna's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Blog Entries: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by weltersys View Post
but with good engineers like Pink Floyd employs to not clean up that mess seems unlikely.
Oh, the Pink Floyd sound puffs air around the room entirely not by accident Same with that BT track, which lulls you into a rather placid track, then at the 5 minute mark, tries really hard to see how far it can make a woofer pop out of the coil gap.

It seems each time I build a new pair of subs I get treated a little more to just how much some of this extremely low and often brutal stuff is present.

As far as the thread title is concerned though, I've been riding the volume control at very spirited levels for a long while. I drink a bit and I like a good kicking tune to go with it, what can I say? Now, with B&G tweets (fairly shy as far as power handling, even the att resistor is only a 12 watt mills) and these two TC Sounds woofers at the other end with an EP2000 behind them..and it's always pretty much my subwoofers that run out of gas before my mains do.

Sure, I get a bit more out of it each time I switch to a new and improved sub, but I've never fried a tweeter...even when I ran a pair of XT25s with nothing but a 12mfd cap and a lack of common sense.

*shrug*
__________________
The best video in the world.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th September 2012, 11:01 AM   #64
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: London, UK
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrecisionAudio View Post
As I do know, very low frequencies require a lot of wattage. Very high ones, not so much at all. But, what is the "wattage curve" if it exists and is there an equation?

I'm just curious to know if an equation exists. I am guessing that the power requirement increases exponentially as the frequency goes down? And, does this involve using the Fletcher-Munson curve also? Then, it becomes a subjective and not an objective calculation...arrrgggghhh.
I think it is an interesting question, and here's my 2p worth attempt to answer :

Ignore the Fletcher-Munson curve for a moment and consider two adjacent octaves each of which has equivalent broad spectrum power content and audible level. Spectral power density W/Hz in the lower octave will be twice that in the higher octave. Then at any arbitrary SPL, spectral power density follows a 1/f characteristic. And at any spot freqency, equivalent power required for the same perceived level would also follow a 1/f characteristic. On assumption our ears hear equivalent broad spectrum noise power as similar levels over a span of octaves. The Fletcher-Munson curve would then modify this, of course.

And empirically, spectral density for most natural sounds, and recorded programme material which sounds balanced, typically follows a 1/f characteristic.

I think !
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th September 2012, 12:36 PM   #65
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: London, UK
On that basis, for typical balanced programme material, 5W at 500Hz would be roughly matched by c 0.5W at 5kHz, and c 50W at 50Hz. Which seems plausible enough, IME. Fletcher Munson aside.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LM3886: Stability at high frequencies and output level Marc Vi Chip Amps 4 10th August 2012 11:01 PM
Amplifier output wattage test scott17 Tubes / Valves 4 27th January 2011 08:40 PM
Output wattage genmin Car Audio 2 22nd December 2009 03:44 PM
Equal-Loudness Curves for low frequencies? Sjoerd v L Subwoofers 4 9th June 2005 10:22 PM
Wattage required for biamped ESL phishead8 Planars & Exotics 6 3rd July 2002 12:42 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:45 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2