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Old 16th September 2012, 12:34 PM   #11
morgoe is offline morgoe  Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keriwena View Post
You may find this useful:

QRD diffusers: Technical Overview

MDF is preferred over hardwoods by many for speakers because hardwoods tend to resonate, and in large panels they can warp or crack (if not humidified properly). With your construction method, however, that shouldn't be a problem, and I agree with pinkmouse hardwoods (or softwoods) would finish better.
Great news about the MDF, if I can stay away from I'd love to. I'll check out that link, thanks.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay View Post
I believe that this is for Art & Design class (not Acoustics). I know that "functions" is always a criteria in object design. But may be your teacher wouldn't care much if the box design will improve anything at all?
Unfortunately not.. I did say that the majority of the work would be in the research and science behind it all, but no dice. I do only have about 6 weeks to complete this in - not a lot of time at all, especially considering I have very little idea what I'm doing, both acoustically and woodworkingly. At some point I'm just going to have to go for it.


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Originally Posted by tvrgeek View Post
I like the art of it.
///
Keep us posted.
Lots of good points in here. I need to do a LOT more research before I can reply in some half-intelligent way. One thing I could stray away from is the box. Perhaps a kind of U shaped cylinder could work?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjeldsen View Post
This one is in danish but with lots of pictures. It's beautifull and requires some woodworking skills.
Looks amazing but the skills required for that are WAY past what I have.




Thanks everyone, I'll bump this later on when I have some more to say/show.
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Old 16th September 2012, 12:44 PM   #12
Rudolf is offline Rudolf  Germany
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People use "diffraction patterns" to attenuate reflections inside of loudspeaker boxes:
morgoe1.jpg
morgoe2.jpg
The shallow patterns above are meant for a midrange driver. For a bass driver you would need a wider distribution of "block depth" inside the box. I could imagine to use block depth differences at the outside as a kind of design element, and (much larger) block depth differences at the inside as an acoustic element. See below a square cutout of a side wall (left outside, right inside):
morgoe3.gif

Rudolf
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Old 16th September 2012, 01:07 PM   #13
ODougbo is offline ODougbo  United States
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What tools/shop do you have to work with?

More info you can give the better, what speakers are you planing on using?





Quote:
Originally Posted by morgoe View Post
Basically, as part of an object design class at uni, I'm making a speaker. Unfortunately, because we're being graded on our woodworking skills, a 'simple' speaker box isn't good enough. I'm trying to come up with an alternative speaker design, and this is what I've come up with.
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Old 16th September 2012, 02:10 PM   #14
tvrgeek is offline tvrgeek  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjeldsen View Post
This one is in danish but with lots of pictures. It's beautifull and requires some woodworking skills.
HIFI4ALL Forum: Mine små nye babyer
Sweet. Now consider if the top was also a simple curve. That is my next goal. Notice how the front is wide enough to allow a smooth driver to baffle.
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Old 16th September 2012, 02:16 PM   #15
tvrgeek is offline tvrgeek  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudolf View Post
People use "diffraction patterns" to attenuate reflections inside of loudspeaker boxes:

The shallow patterns above are meant for a midrange driver. For a bass driver you would need a wider distribution of "block depth" inside the box. I could imagine to use block depth differences at the outside as a kind of design element, and (much larger) block depth differences at the inside as an acoustic element. See below a square cutout of a side wall (left outside, right inside):


Rudolf
Refection and diffraction do not attenuate. To attenuate you stuff. All this looks like nothing a simple non parallel wall would do ans the sizes look like they would only have any effect at very high frequencies. Irrevelant for a midrange.

People do all sorts of things, like jump out of perfectly good airplanes. It does not make it a good idea.
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Old 16th September 2012, 02:20 PM   #16
ODougbo is offline ODougbo  United States
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I was thinking along the lines of a double salad bowel with a full range driver.

What's the budget? btw.


Amazon.com: 8 Inch Unfinished Solid Beech Wood Bowl: Arts, Crafts & Sewing

10" 2 for $33

http://www.amazon.com/Inch-Unfinishe...nfinished+bowl
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Old 16th September 2012, 02:23 PM   #17
tvrgeek is offline tvrgeek  United States
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Take a look at the True Audio web where he has much of Olson's work on diffraction posted. I think you can go someplace with the blocks. Think about the "Danish" shape but done with bricks and the initial baffle to sided a smooth radius. You could do that with just coarse sandpaper and a block. If you can cut the blocks and the baffle, you can do about anything

True Audio TechTopics: Diffraction Loss
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Old 16th September 2012, 02:32 PM   #18
tvrgeek is offline tvrgeek  United States
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OD', Back to too small of a sphere to make the frame to baffle smooth problem. Tweeter size at best. Was talking to NonSuch about using a beach ball as a fiberglass form. You could flatten one side to make the baffle and still get a nice radius.

A good idea to think about a full range as learning to do a crossover for a design class is quite an undertaking. Been at at for 35 years and just getting a handle on it. Just don't pick the 125! Maybe the 105 in an egg made of the blocks. Rear port. No BSC needed. Why don't we do one? If it works we could do a Louther.
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Old 16th September 2012, 02:40 PM   #19
ODougbo is offline ODougbo  United States
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Could build a U shape box, form with 3/4" ply and build box up with layers of 1/8 Birch bending ply. Clamp/glue and then belt sand.

Back to the OP, if you need speakers and assuming you're on a budget, get out there and look for yard sale speakers.

Now Now TVR, pour little 125wk, that's a heck of a driver.
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Old 16th September 2012, 02:49 PM   #20
bwaslo is offline bwaslo  United States
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With your little pieces of wood, your overall shape isn't restricted to a box. You could cut small flat wood rings or squares to mount the drivers in and construct the baffle connected to them (as well as all the other walls) by irregularly stacking and gluing the small pieces into other shapes such as an egg shape (though a chunky one). If glued well enough, you could take a belt sander to the outside to smooth sharp edges. Fill the gaps between pieces and seal the box with bar-top epoxy coating. It would be a unique shape and an argument could be made for good acoustic performance.
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