Please help for Monitor Audio GS20 crossover tuning - diyAudio
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Old 3rd April 2012, 01:45 PM   #1
roender is offline roender  Romania
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Default Please help for Monitor Audio GS20 crossover tuning

Hello guys!

This is my first post in loudspeakers forum but I have a very log experience with solid state amplifiers :-)
I would like to ask you for advice regarding my speaker crossover upgrade.
The loudspeaker is Monitor Audio GS20 and it has the following crossover (please see the pictures below)
In you expert opinion, what can be improved here?

Thank you very much,
Mihai
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File Type: jpg GS20-crossoverSCH.jpg (140.3 KB, 193 views)
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Old 3rd April 2012, 02:35 PM   #2
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It's difficult to say without knowing what to expect, or your expectations are.
My only first impression is that nothing, unless I wanted change something (sound wise). So I would shoot for the tweeter crossover cap as a way for you to spend money. Buy a matched pair of very good caps for your tweeters.
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Old 3rd April 2012, 02:44 PM   #3
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Is there some to change?
Don't you like the sound?
Components look to be appropriate and suitable.
A polypropylene cap in series, two polyester in parallel. A big iron core in series, just to knock down the coil resistance.
This kind of simple configuration doesn't cause a loss of sensitivity.
Monitor Audio is a serious make, in which way do you ask for a tweaking?
Do you want to change crossover frequencies? Orders? Slopes?
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Old 3rd April 2012, 03:09 PM   #4
roender is offline roender  Romania
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The GS20 speakers are good but a little, just a little, to bright :-) ... and this brightness somehow covers the mid bass.
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Old 3rd April 2012, 03:47 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roender View Post
The GS20 speakers are good but a little, just a little, to bright :-) ... and this brightness somehow covers the mid bass.
Haaah, I have to agree with you, in some of my listening tests at the presentation events. I personally never liked that. I'm not saying it's this model or other...
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Old 3rd April 2012, 04:05 PM   #6
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It' difficult to guess, without measuring or simulating.
It could be freq. peaks (drivers) or loudspeaker design (crossover), or both. As a blind shoot I would shunt the 1R at the mid crossover and test the difference. There was a thread ~1 year ago here @diy for the same problem, on another brand speaker. If it was only the tweeter I would add (and have on my Focals, really) a simple shoulder pad.
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Old 3rd April 2012, 04:05 PM   #7
roender is offline roender  Romania
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So, what can be done?
Better caps? ... maybe Mundorf silver/oil? or Sonicap Gen 1?
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Old 3rd April 2012, 04:09 PM   #8
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The first thing I would look at are the iron cored inductors, try to replace them with air cores with the same inductance / Rdc. This can give you some improvements especially when played loud.

Next up would be the capacitors, maybe some nice 400VDC poly's.

The last step would be to replace the resistors with MOX type resistors. Maybe try 1R5, 1R8, 2R2 to damp the tweeter a bit more since you indicated they where a bit "bright"
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Last edited by Mark.Clappers; 3rd April 2012 at 04:12 PM.
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Old 3rd April 2012, 04:19 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark.Clappers View Post
The first thing I would look at are the iron cored inductors, try to replace them with air cores with the same inductance / Rdc. This can give you some improvements especially when played loud.

Next up would be the capacitors, maybe some nice 400VDC poly's.

The last step would be to replace the resistors with MOX type resistors. Maybe try 1R5, 1R8, 2R2 to damp the tweeter a bit more since you indicated they where a bit "bright"
@Mihai
Usually when you have an air core instead of the cored inductor, you can have a little more resistance, but I' not keen for that to solve the problem. It would affect the bass/lower bass instead. As I said on my first post, I doubt this is a component quality problem. It's obvious I agree with last paragraph, test and see.
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Old 3rd April 2012, 06:29 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inductor View Post
@Mihai
Usually when you have an air core instead of the cored inductor, you can have a little more resistance, but I' not keen for that to solve the problem. It would affect the bass/lower bass instead. As I said on my first post, I doubt this is a component quality problem. It's obvious I agree with last paragraph, test and see.
Inductor is right. If high section is too bright you may add a bland resistor in series to the midrange or to the tweeter (1 ohm), and a stronger one in parallel (20 ohm) - (a L-pad network).
If this is the problem (hi section too bright), pls don't touch the cored inductor. It does not affect the extension of bass tones; on the contrary, using an air cored coil (which is in general better for sound quality, anyway), the certain result is to increase the resistance in series to the woofer of 0,5/1 ohm, making the situation worst (it would sound weaker).
In this case, the same value of the so-called hidden resistor (typical of the air-cored inductor), should be added (in series) to the tweeter and the midrange, making loudspeakers less efficient.
As I don't know the drivers specifications, I can't suggest whether to add even a RLC notch filter.
A Hallo from Italy
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