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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

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Old 10th April 2012, 02:03 AM   #21
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I have assembled and tested the speakers - the back is just tacked on for the moment as I have not added polyester fill or made any tweaks yet.

Bass sounds good from very low frequencies all the way up to mid bass levels, much better that I had hoped. Treble sounds ok but the mids are very lacking in detail, mids just sound muddy.

I did listen on a very humid day in the middle of a low pressure system. Mids normally sound average to me under these conditions anyway, I am hoping for better results on my next listen.

If things don’t improve would this be an appropriate replacement woofer?
http://jaycar.co.nz/productView.asp?ID=CW2196&form=CAT2&SUBCATID=1008# 4
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Old 14th April 2012, 04:23 AM   #22
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I have now filled the speakers with polyester fill and have given them a better temporary seal for testing.

Sounding much better now, still not quite right at low volumes. EQing the treble up a little seems to balance things out, should I just attenuate the woofer with a resistor network?

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Old 14th April 2012, 07:43 AM   #23
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Default Running in

Hi,
don't be too hasty.
Speakers need some running in. Generally 40-60 hours of work at least.
Last week I've finished a new pair of loudspeakers. At the beginning they were very crisp and rather forward. After a week, they sound now exaggeratedly warm to me. This is because new woofers have surrounds still hard, and they must be softened with use.
I've seen that in your case we have a different situation; anyway, wait a little, before operating.
Another important thing to consider is the place where your box shall be put. Do you have carpets or curtains in the place where you've done the test? Textiles make tones warmer. Something similar happens if you put the boxes near a wall or, even, close to a corner. In this case, sound generally becomes warmer, but, at the same time, flatter.
My last advice. I've not read the specifications of your single speakers, but before putting a resistor or a L-Pad network, try to dampen them with a thick pad (1" - 1.5") of acrylic wool or (better) of raw wool, fastening it to the interior of the front panel.
Hi again from Italy

Last edited by slovnaft; 14th April 2012 at 07:47 AM. Reason: Explanation improvement
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Old 14th April 2012, 09:29 AM   #24
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Default Errata corrige

Quote:
Originally Posted by slovnaft View Post
Hi,
don't be too hasty.
Speakers need some running in. Generally 40-60 hours of work at least.
Last week I've finished a new pair of loudspeakers. At the beginning they were very crisp and rather forward. After a week, they sound now exaggeratedly warm to me. This is because new woofers have surrounds still hard, and they must be softened with use.
I've seen that in your case we have a different situation; anyway, wait a little, before operating.
Another important thing to consider is the place where your box shall be put. Do you have carpets or curtains in the place where you've done the test? Textiles make tones warmer. Something similar happens if you put the boxes near a wall or, even, close to a corner. In this case, sound generally becomes warmer, but, at the same time, flatter.
My last advice. I've not read the specifications of your single speakers, but before putting a resistor or a L-Pad network, try to dampen them with a thick pad (1" - 1.5") of acrylic wool or (better) of raw wool, fastening it to the interior of the front panel.
Hi again from Italy
I've read all the 3d paying more attention... Do not consider my last advice, if your low frequencies are satisfying. The result would be the opposite of what you expect.
Go on with running in stage for some days, then post your second opinion.
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Old 14th April 2012, 12:08 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacobthellamer View Post
I have now filled the speakers with polyester fill and have given them a better temporary seal for testing.

Sounding much better now, still not quite right at low volumes. EQing the treble up a little seems to balance things out, should I just attenuate the woofer with a resistor network?

Click the image to open in full size.
The horn thing around the tweeter is probably causing lots of issues like resonance, boosting of the upper mids etc contributing the "muddy" sound. It's not nearly shallow enough to work as a waveguide. Try mounting the tweeter on the outside and things should improve alot.
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Old 14th April 2012, 12:46 PM   #26
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Default Countersink lapping

Quote:
Originally Posted by samadhi View Post
The horn thing around the tweeter is probably causing lots of issues like resonance, boosting of the upper mids etc contributing the "muddy" sound. It's not nearly shallow enough to work as a waveguide. Try mounting the tweeter on the outside and things should improve alot.
Samadhi is right!
I forgot yo write it...
You have two chances:
1. Try to sandpaper the countersink around the tweeter, removing the round cuts and widening the external circumference, keeping unchanged the internal diameter. If you feel able about this kind of manual operations, you can try to mold a cone-shaped countersink just like a sort of waveguide. Even if baffle is rather thin, IMHO, this solution wouldn't be so bad, not affecting sound as present situation does; many little neodimium tweeters are shaped so like.
2. On the contrary, mount the tweeter on the external surface, as suggested.

You can immediately try this last solution (#2), just to realize probable sound improvements.
Then, decide what to do.
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Old 13th May 2012, 09:15 PM   #27
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Update - I have attacked the baffle around the tweeter with a rotary rasp and sand paper. The resulting curve seems shallow enough to act as a wave guide now, I have my trebble back.

I have ordered a re-foaming kit for the drivers and should have some ferrofluid arive for the tweets today.
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