ACTIVE BI -AMPING .... what is the correct amount of bass, treble, and mid? - diyAudio
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Old 28th October 2011, 01:47 PM   #1
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Default ACTIVE BI -AMPING .... what is the correct amount of bass, treble, and mid?

I've already completed my active xover speaker system .... their amps, and also active xovers ....

I need help .... what is the correct amount of bass , mid and treble ... i meant not too much treble ... mid or bass .... because when listen to different track of mp3 ... some have either too much or too little amount of bass, mid , or treble ...

so what is the method to calibrate an active xover system .... Thanks ...
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Old 28th October 2011, 02:00 PM   #2
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I've done mine to get a flat response in room.

But there will always be some tracks which are bass-light (tinny) sounding and other bass-heavy (mushy) and so forth. There is no way to calibrate the producers, artists or engineers ears so it will always be like that.
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Old 28th October 2011, 02:03 PM   #3
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so is there a quick method to set the bass, treble , and mid level correctly ?

mine is a bi-amp system with 3 midrange, 2 tweeters, and a subwoofer
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Old 28th October 2011, 02:04 PM   #4
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Hi,

Well it all depends on your personal preference. Flat from 20Hz to 20KHz would be right on the money for a (studio) monitor, but very hard to achieve.

Some people like the "disco smile" EQ (~5dB gain on the lows and highs flat in the middle).

The best way to measure would be, IMHO, with pink noise and a spectrum analyzer. see what the response is at the moment and define a EQ curve that suites your personal preference. There a many tools that can do this, both in SW and HW (for example a Behringer DEQ2496 can do all this for you).

I would start by setting the levels on your amps in such a way that the drivers have the same acoustical output. This of course depends on your enclosure, driver efficiency, amp gain, baffle step, ...
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Old 28th October 2011, 03:02 PM   #5
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This is not a simple question.

Many factors come into play, and your choice will definitely be a compromise. The degree of compromise will vary depending on the specifics of your speakers and room.

FLAT is NOT a good option. First of all you can't find a way to make a flat response. Second, if you could, then it would sound like dog poop because of one of those pesky factors. I'll explain.

What you hear at the listening position is NOT just the on axis response. You could make that FLAT if and only if your drivers all had a flat response. They don't. If you made that flat, it would not likely sound flat because of the rest of the energy in the room and the polar response of your drivers.

Your ear more or less averages what is going on at the listening position. The on axis energy predominates.

Non flat drivers - and most are - will confound any attempt to make a measured flat response. The ear will hear the peak(s) not the average across a few octaves.

The entire explanation would take a few pages probably and requires more than a basic understanding of drivers/speakers, xovers and rooms

My suggestion is to use pink noise as a source, moderate volume, not loud. Then set the balance between any two adjacent drivers, like tweeter and mid so that when you listen you hear only a smooth "waterfall" sound, not one driver over the other. Then do the same with the other pair - mid to bass. Now you are pretty darn close.

Keep in mind that a peak(s) in the response of say a tweeter or midrange will make this balance difficult to find and somewhat uncertain... but you will still be pretty close and maybe find a spot that is as good as you can find with your given system. A good compromise.

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Old 28th October 2011, 06:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dannyjmf View Post
I need help .... what is the correct amount of bass , mid and treble ... i meant not too much treble ... mid or bass ....
Try to borrow a RTA from a friend. The DOD RTA comes with a mic and has Pink Noise output.
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Old 28th October 2011, 06:55 PM   #7
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/

FLAT is NOT a good option. First of all you can't find a way to make a flat response.

\

Wel actually you can do it for a specific point in your listening room with some brute force FIR filtering for example. The question really is do you want to do this? the answer is probably no...

Still using pink noise and some kind of feedback mechanism is the way to go (be it your ears or a spectrum analyzer of some kind)

There are plenty of audio files floating around the internet with pink noise, download one of them and get crackin'


Good luck!
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Old 28th October 2011, 07:02 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by dannyjmf View Post
so what is the method to calibrate an active xover system .... Thanks ...
Panasonic WM-61A + Holmimpulse. Can't get any easier.
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Old 28th October 2011, 07:15 PM   #9
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Something you could do right away is play some of your best recordings (preferably in a lossless format) and set the controls for optimum SQ. Then resign yourself to the fact that not all recordings are equal, and the tinny and mushy are more likely source issues not playback issues.
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Old 28th October 2011, 07:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
mine is a bi-amp system with 3 midrange, 2 tweeters, and a subwoofer
Not clear, more infos needed
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