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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

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Old 25th February 2011, 05:12 PM   #11
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I believe not. Personally I'd bin Linux (and possibly BruteFIR) rather than the Lynx and just use Win7. You might get BruteFIR to run with jack4win - I've no idea - but the ASIO drivers are probably OK and there are software crossover packages for PC - see www.thuneau.com.

Or maybe use a Mac as the host?
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Old 25th February 2011, 07:54 PM   #12
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I'd be inclined to agree, I don't really see the benefits of linux anymore. Sure back in '05 we had XP and shortly afterwards Vista. Both not particularly great OS's when it came to not mangling the hell out of audio. But with Win7 the audio handling is pretty damned good.

The only reason for going linux would be if you wanted a really trimmed down box that its only purpose would be XO duties.
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Old 25th February 2011, 10:00 PM   #13
RobHolt is offline RobHolt  United Kingdom
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That's exactly what I want, a dedicated PC xover that can be treated like hardware.
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Old 25th February 2011, 10:02 PM   #14
Tenson is offline Tenson  United Kingdom
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That's exactly what I want, a dedicated PC xover that can be treated like hardware. Looks like I might have to sell the Lynx and get an RME.
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Old 26th February 2011, 05:21 AM   #15
boris81 is offline boris81  United States
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i like the kx-project. it's a free driver for the creative audigy soundcards that allows the user to reprogram the onboard dsp on teh fly. it's free, all your computer sounds play directly through it and re-routing, changing crossovers and filters is trivial. the only limitation that i see to it is the 16bit/48kHz sampling rate but since all music comes on cds i don't view that as a serious drawback.
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Old 26th February 2011, 02:53 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenson View Post
That's exactly what I want, a dedicated PC xover that can be treated like hardware. Looks like I might have to sell the Lynx and get an RME.
You might be right. I was following up with RMS tech on their AES card and they told me:

>>>>>
Hello,


I could probably accomodate the PCI card too (HDSP AES-32). The main question is whether there is a recommended (or supported) passive interface to SPDIF voltages and whether (preferably) the data stream can be configured to consumer rather than pro.

Not necessary... Here's a quote from the manual:

"If Output Format Professional is chosen, the output level is almost 5 Volt. If deselected, the
output signal will have a channel status compatible to SPDIF. As far as we know, every SPDIF
device should be capable of handling an input signal of up to 5 Volt instead of the usual 0.5
Volt. Nevertheless the output level will be reduced to 2 Volt in this case.

Connecting devices with coaxial SPDIF ports to the HDSPe AES outputs is accomplished by a
simple cable adapter XLR/phono, as described above. Just use a female XLR connector. "
<<<<<

I have no idea whether the card is as good as a Lynx - the Lynx cards seem to be very highly regarded. Nor am I absolutely certain that the RME device will be plug and play with Linux, since the kernel devs seem to have scant regard for audio at the best of times and 'supported' has sometime meant things I'd personally describe as 'partially supported and sometimes unreliable'.

Still, the RME is about 600quid I think.
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Old 26th February 2011, 02:58 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by boris81 View Post
the only limitation that i see to it is the 16bit/48kHz sampling rate but since all music comes on cds i don't view that as a serious drawback.
I think 16/48 *is* an issue. I was thinking about this the other day when considering the miniDSP devices, which do 24/48 I believe. I think that's probably more necessary than having a higher Nyquist frequency - it means that you can scale up the samples and the crossover scaling (which tends to be a fractional multiplier - same for volume control) will not immediately start to lose bits of precision.

But this is conjecture. Are you planning volume control in the analogue domain after the crossover?
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Old 26th February 2011, 03:01 PM   #18
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Lynx has linux driver , someone even using it with sonar equiptment.
http://manuals.opensound.com/devlists/lynxtwo.html
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Old 26th February 2011, 03:15 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by tritosine View Post
Lynx has linux driver , someone even using it with sonar equiptment.
http://manuals.opensound.com/devlists/lynxtwo.html
I think the notes on that page pretty much sum up why I'd give consideration for using a Lynx with Win7 or a Mac!

I guess his jobs-ness doesn't see fit to allow a PCIe on an iMac so its not very practical, which is a shame since the small iMac might be fine otherwise.

Shame you can't get something with similar audio capability in a case that matches a mini, really.
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Old 27th February 2011, 12:23 AM   #20
boris81 is offline boris81  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jman11964 View Post
I think 16/48 *is* an issue. I was thinking about this the other day when considering the miniDSP devices, which do 24/48 I believe. I think that's probably more necessary than having a higher Nyquist frequency - it means that you can scale up the samples and the crossover scaling (which tends to be a fractional multiplier - same for volume control) will not immediately start to lose bits of precision.

But this is conjecture. Are you planning volume control in the analogue domain after the crossover?
I have all computer volumes at 100% and I use the amplifier knob to control the loudness.

I don't find 16/48 to be an issue for me but I agree that upsampling will sound better. I'm almost certain that there is a digital output from the dsp and maybe that output can be upsampled by a hi-fi DAC at the end of the chain. I'm currently using a software upsampler in winamp to convert 44.1kHz tracks to 48kHz but I haven't experimented fully with that option.

If I understand solutions like miniDSP and DCX2496 correctly, they digitize incoming analog signal, process it and then convert it back to analog. Assuming you play CDs you start with 44.1 -> 96 -> analog -> 96 -> processing -> analog. With kx-project you skip 2 of the steps but you never upsample. I don't know which sounds better ultimately and I'd love to see a test done.
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