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Old 23rd November 2008, 06:11 PM   #1
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Default Speaker repairs

Just collected a pair of goodmans twin axiette 8's.

Unfortunately, when i got there the seller had had time to test them and one doesnt work.

Shame, but we came to an arrangement and a deal was done so no biggie.

So, im now on the look out for another.

In the mean time, can they be fixed? Theres no continuity between the terminals, the wires to the cone have no continuity, i can get to the inner terminals too, underneath the 'tweeter' cone and theres no continuity there either.

I must confess i dont actually have any idea how speakers are put together, or even exactly how they work :roll: , so, can anyone point me at some basic diagrams? What are the chances of being able to disassemble so i can get in to try and fix the problem? Whats the problem even likely to be?

Any ideas folks?

Or is it beyond help?
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Old 23rd November 2008, 08:58 PM   #2
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Default Hi Graeme

Hello,

What do you mean with: "Theres no continuity between the terminals"?

Can you see the wires going to the coil/ coils - I don't know the Goodmans, but every speaker can have wires or coils replaced. Have you messured the DC ohm resistance with a voltmeter between the terminals?

On several units it is impossible to follow the wires going to the coils - on some coaxial speakers there are hidden wires to the tweeter.

Take a picture of the problem, and I shall try to advise you to a german repair technician from the former Isophon.

Rgds
Kim
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Old 24th November 2008, 09:35 AM   #3
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Thanks. Ill take some pics and post them up so you can see what i mean
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Old 24th November 2008, 08:27 PM   #4
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I bit the bullet today and took the driver apart.

Delicate work as i want to keep all the origional parts but i managed to get to the voice coil and repair the break.

Multimeter says its fine now and reads the same resistance as the working driver so i just need to glue it bakc together now.

And recomendations on glue to stick the surround back to the basket? Looks like it was some kind of rubber glue origionally.
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Old 24th November 2008, 09:19 PM   #5
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Default Glue?

Quote:
Originally posted by graeme uk


Multimeter says its fine now and reads the same resistance as the working driver so i just need to glue it bakc together now.

And recomendations on glue to stick the surround back to the basket? Looks like it was some kind of rubber glue origionally.


Depending on where the coil was disconnected , vibrations can take the soldering apart. I could advice you to draw a tiny part out from the coil ( make it a little longer) , this should keep the connection longer. If it was only a loose end - no problem.
.
As for the glue - you are right. Following link in Netherlands offers surroundings and glue ( on rubberbasis). Please inform the company of the cone - and surround type before ordering.

http://www.audiofriends.nl/foam-surrounds/

Rgds
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Old 24th November 2008, 09:31 PM   #6
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Ill probably just go to the local DIY shop and buy whatever they have that will do.

As far as the voice coil is concerned, thats what i did.

The coil had continuity but i couldnt find the break so i ran a new wire through to the lead out wire, peeled away the end of the voice coil and fixed it that way. I twisted the ends a little then soldered. I then glues it all back so it wont foul as the speaker moves.

If its rubberized glue ill probably use evostick or something similar.
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Old 24th November 2008, 10:02 PM   #7
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Default evostick...

...if I remember correctly is pretty "smelly", the solvent they use may be more aggressive than you want. I recently re-foamed a speaker using a kit. IIRC the glue supplied was some sort of white polyurethane, no aroma or fumes at all, not super tacky, but dried hard and clear.

If you are in any doubt test a small area and make sure the surround, cloth, rubber or foam is not attacked. I used clothes pegs to hold the foam flat against the frame, after a couple of hours everything was better than new.

HTH

Stuart
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Old 24th November 2008, 10:04 PM   #8
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Good point, ill check first. the surrounds are a bit odd, i think there rubber impregnated cloth and pretty fragile. Still nice and supple, but delicate.

Theres not a large amount of overhang onto the basket either and the surrounds seem to be part of the cone.
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