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Old 2nd November 2008, 10:44 PM   #1
pjpoes is offline pjpoes  United States
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Default Quick fix for an absent minded mistake

This is an old trick, but I couldn't find anything about it here, and thought that some of you might find this useful. I imagine I am not the only person to ever accidentally route the wrong size hole for a speaker. Often when I do this its because I I think I have accurately measured half of the cut hole, and end up being off by 1/16" or something. Not a lot, but more than enough to keep the speaker from fitting. I know a common fix is to sand it larger or file it larger. I think this is quicker and more elegant.

I use the hole I just cut out (round piece of wood, I know the hole is the empty space I left), and tack it to a piece of 2" wide pine stock (or any piece of wood for that matter) long enough to span the hole. I then use a few piece of thick felt to act as spacers to help in centering this inside the hole I just routed, and tack the wood stock backing to the back of the baffle. This then allows me to reroute the hole larger, or, if need be, add a recess, in case I forgot to do that. I'm sure none of you ever make mistakes like this, or ever forget to route a recess, but in case you ever do, this is a quick fix.

If you use a brad nailer like I do (Part of what makes this so quick is the brad nailer), then I set the brad nailer so that the nails don't go all the way in. I also use short nails, like 1.5" or so. This way I can more easily pull them out when I'm done.
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Old 2nd November 2008, 11:14 PM   #2
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Default Re: Quick fix for an absent minded mistake

Quote:
Originally posted by pjpoes
If you use a brad nailer like I do (Part of what makes this so quick is the brad nailer), then I set the brad nailer so that the nails don't go all the way in. I also use short nails, like 1.5" or so. This way I can more easily pull them out when I'm done.
I use them on my cleats and leave them there. Since the nails stick out you can hang your damping on them

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Old 2nd November 2008, 11:55 PM   #3
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An easier way of doing this it to not cut all of the way through in the first place, but leave a bit to cut through and trim with a sharp knife.
It's safer also, as the router bit doesn't go crazy at the end of the cut.
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