Building the Nathan 10 - Page 5 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 31st July 2008, 06:02 PM   #41
Salas is offline Salas  Greece
diyAudio Chief Moderator
 
Salas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Athens-Greece
He he, I must be a detective!
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 06:08 PM   #42
gedlee is offline gedlee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Novi, Michigan
Quote:
Originally posted by markus76


To be pedantic: no. You missed the question on lacquer. And another one again: the one on rounding the base.

What lacquer is used on the Ai ones? Such a finish would be an option for me if I don't get the enclosures smooth enough. Is it something similar to DuraTex?

Best, Markus

Markus

I must have gone to the wrong post - I scanned for "?" and the only two that I saw I answered.

I don't use laquer as its too smelly for home use. I actually make my own paint, but thats another story altogether Graingers sells very good paint in a wide variety and they are everywhere. Look for Acrylic Enamel (rust-o-leum) and use an Epoxy primer. They have water based and regular. I use water based, but its not as good, just a lot easier to use. I buy bulk acrylic from an outlet in Madison Wis. and mix my own colors to the clear. I make all my own hobby paint as this stuff is ridiculously expensive - about $1 / ml.

Ai used several different kinds of paint the rough texture came from Australia, and the red was automotive acylic laquer from Sikkens. That stuff could kill you! But it makes a great finish.

As to rounding the bottom, its an option. I used to do it, but it is a pain to paint and the cabinet tends to roll forward if bumped. Since this edge is far from the tweeter, the woofer is in between and it usually sits on a stand, I opt to leave it off.

There are textured paint spray cans that I have used and they come out pretty well. The texture would hide just about any flaw. I will be painting mine in a high gloss red and I will post that finish and you will see that the edges will look just fine. A little filler and some sanding and you can cure anything. I would never ship anything that can't be fixed with reasonable work. All the flaws that you showed can easily be fixed once the enclosure is assmbled. A sharp edge has to fit perfectly, but a rounded one is very forgiving. You will see this when you get it together.
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 06:09 PM   #43
gedlee is offline gedlee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Novi, Michigan
Quote:
Originally posted by Luke G


I plan on doing white enclosures with a black waveguide, so I'll have to paint them separately. What do you recommend to clean off the mold release prior to painting? I don't want to mess up the polyurethane with something too harsh.
I plan to use acetone. I don't think that will be a problem.
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 06:23 PM   #44
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Quote:
Originally posted by gedlee
Dennis

The top edge is less critical for diffraction, but I still think it important. And yes, it is the hardest edge to get right, but its still no problem to get right as my photo shows. As I said we need to see what other builders think as Marcus seems to be pretty picky.

You will notice from my photo that the rounded edge DOES have to be sanded down into the side panels. This is to be expected. Sanding this by hand may be somewhat tedious, but with an inexpensive sander it only takes about a minute to get right once everything is glued together.

Earl,

I think we are on the same page but just want to be sure. I wasn't suggesting getting rid of the any of the front baffle roundovers.

My suggestion was to leave the roundover on all four edges of the front baffle, just eliminate the roundover that runs from the front to back on the top panel of the cabinet. This would make the top and bottom panels identical and simplify the assembly for the user. It would also allow the builder the option of veneering the main cabinet and only painting the baffle.

I am sure there would be some additional diffraction effects from having the 45 deg edge where the horizontal and vertical roundovers on the front baffle meet. While I haven't measured or caluclated the difference vs smoothing that corner out and rounding it off it certainly has to be less than no roundover at all.

Kind regards,

Dennis
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 06:24 PM   #45
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Quote:
Originally posted by gedlee
It will be a little while before I build Nathans again as I am in the middle of developing the Abbey and I don't have the room for doing both at the same time.
So have you sent out all the 10" waveguides from this last run? So it will be over a month before you make more?
__________________
~Brandon
DriverVault Soma Sonus Old Driver Tests
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 06:53 PM   #46
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cheshire
I think that Marcus and everyone else is being incredibly polite.

This is an absolute discrace. I can't believe that Earl is defending this poor quality of production.

As our fine Prince Philip would say: It looks like it has been put together by a bunch of Indians (he meant cowboys).

How can you say that this kit is not designed for beginners? No seasoned builder would put up with this kind of rubbish, they would start again from scratch keeping the baffle because of the waveguide. You couldn't even be bothered to package it so that it would not be damaged in transit.

Shame on you.

From Post 15 "It's always refreshing when a mfg. stands by their product and acknowledge that "the customer is always right", a well known (if somewhat dubious) reality of the business world.

it's also nice to see a response that doesn't patronize and/or chastise the customer for their perspective, especially on a DIY board.

Caveat Emptor I guess."

Well stated
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 06:56 PM   #47
pjpoes is offline pjpoes  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: New York
Send a message via AIM to pjpoes
Quote:
Originally posted by Fosti


A lot of words, that may lead some people to the belief that this is so, but.....everyone can read about that topic in good books. Only so much: The probably best studio monitors in the world are active (and German ): Look for the MEG RL901
or
K+H O500C



It's polite to honor someone for his scientific reputation, but gedlee is not the only one with a PhD here in the forum....some may be even a Dr.-Ing. (<-- that's German, too)
I'm not sure what you are trying to say here, it is so. Crossing over a high level or low level signal is, at its essence essentially the same. They are filtering a signal , period. The only difference is really the "wattage" of that signal, and the load impedance presented to the crossover. If you read a good book on the subject and didn't understand that much, then i recomend you find a better good book.

I honor Dr. Geddes with the term Dr. because its a convention. I am in my third year of my PhD program and I know that unless they tell you otherwise, its considered best practice to call someone Dr. I also know that, at least for me, once I'm done spending the better part of 10 years in college, I too would like people to call me Dr rather than Mr.

As for the view of the greatest speakers, well I think that is a highly highly debated subject. Is greatest based on number of users, I think that would make the bose wave radio number one. Is it based on number of professional audio users, well that would put the Yamaha NS-10M's at number one last I checked. If its based on opinion, even professional opinion, then again, we have thousands of options that people feel are the best. West Lake Audio and JBL have made some of the finest professional studio monitors I have ever heard, neither of which use active crossovers or biamping in their design. Does that make them the best? Well I think its my opinion, nothing more. Maybe Dr. Geddes makes the best, I haven't heard them yet, but it does seem like some very sound science is behind his designs, so we shall see.
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 07:07 PM   #48
gedlee is offline gedlee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Novi, Michigan
Quote:
Originally posted by pjpoes
Maybe Dr. Geddes makes the best, I haven't heard them yet, but it does seem like some very sound science is behind his designs, so we shall see.
And please check the reviews on my web site www.gedlee.com. Those speakers are all passive and five of five said that they were the best that they have heard. I'm not saying that active is bad, only that it isn't necessary, especially in a lower cost design. It addes A LOT of cost.
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 07:11 PM   #49
gedlee is offline gedlee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Novi, Michigan
Quote:
Originally posted by djarchow



Earl,

I think we are on the same page but just want to be sure. I wasn't suggesting getting rid of the any of the front baffle roundovers.

My suggestion was to leave the roundover on all four edges of the front baffle, just eliminate the roundover that runs from the front to back on the top panel of the cabinet. This would make the top and bottom panels identical and simplify the assembly for the user. It would also allow the builder the option of veneering the main cabinet and only painting the baffle.

I am sure there would be some additional diffraction effects from having the 45 deg edge where the horizontal and vertical roundovers on the front baffle meet. While I haven't measured or caluclated the difference vs smoothing that corner out and rounding it off it certainly has to be less than no roundover at all.

Kind regards,

Dennis

Its the sharp edge on the top two corners that you mention, very close to the waveguide, that concerns me. Rounding it over requires that the top edges be rounded also. I can certainly ship the enclosure without this rounding, but I would not recommend it. Again, I have not had a problem. A little sanding, problem solved.
  Reply With Quote
Old 31st July 2008, 07:13 PM   #50
gedlee is offline gedlee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Novi, Michigan
Quote:
Originally posted by augerpro


So have you sent out all the 10" waveguides from this last run? So it will be over a month before you make more?

Yes, that is correct. I am setting up now for the 12" model. Then run some parts and back to the 10". If you were in the queue already then you will get yours, but I can't run anything new for another month.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:45 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2