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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

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Old 2nd June 2008, 01:33 AM   #21
eyekode is offline eyekode  United States
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And one last thing: It seems I _always_ leave some circular marks on the baffles when I route the cut-out. Make _sure_ your circle cutting jig is clean before putting it down on the baffle.

If you use a homemade jig like me then it is a good idea to lightly sand the bottom of the jig between changing radius.
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Old 2nd June 2008, 01:42 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally posted by eyekode
1) when I route a cut-out I always drive my pivot nail into the substrate below and clamp the baffle really well. Otherwise when the bit is finished with the circle nothing holds the center material and it will likely screw up the edge of the cut-out.

Hi,
Better to not route all of the way through the baffle, but leave about 1/16" and finish this with a sharp knife and sand smooth. This is the safest way.

I must agree about the recess. It's much better to route this first, then the hole rather than use a rabbit bit.

BTW JLC7 nice looking job so far.
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Old 2nd June 2008, 01:42 AM   #23
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I think a common solution to the router guide scuffing is to apply contact paper to the veneer before making the cut.

zaph describes the process in his design "mantras"

http://www.zaphaudio.com/mantras.html

Regards,
David
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Old 2nd June 2008, 05:50 AM   #24
JLC7 is offline JLC7  United States
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Thanks for the suggestions guys. I think I'll cut the recesses with the jig before cutting the main hole out. I agree, any mistakes there will be forgivable while trying to the the hole outright and then rabbeting might not be forgiving.

Here are a few more pictures of the veneering process:

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First apply glue to the back of the veneer and let dry. I bought a cheap foam roller and 97 cent plastic paint tray. If you want to save money, you could swap out the tray for a plastic plate, or that fancy china sitting in the cupboard that never gets used...

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Find some way of cutting the veneer sheets roughly to the size you need them to be. Leave some excess to accommodate for Murphy's law.

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I placed the seam from the veneer sheet in the middle of the side/top to keep things consistent. I couldn't use the veneer as efficiently this way as there was a bit more waste, but it was the only way to keep things neat looking.

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I cut open an old t-shirt to make it easier to cover the veneer. Then proceed to heat the sheet until it sticks... only it's not sticking... or heating up...



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Well I obviously know how to use a clothes iron. No really I do, the picture lies. Don't listen to it.



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The flush trim bit leaves some fuzz when cutting against the grain. You can easily sand this off.

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After sanding the fuzz off, you'll probably have a bit of paper/glue hanging out between the pieces of veneer. This comes off easily with sandpaper.

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Be safe. Beee goooood. Ell-iii-otttt.

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Fully veneered cabinets ready for hole cutting.

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Test cabinets to the right will also get new holes and I'll be using them to test the drivers while I finish the veneered cabinets.
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Old 2nd June 2008, 09:57 AM   #25
Luke is offline Luke  New Zealand
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nice work. I used ados contact adhesive and it eventually split and faded badly in sunlight. Is the iron on less likely to split do you think?
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Old 2nd June 2008, 07:09 PM   #26
JLC7 is offline JLC7  United States
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Quote:
nice work. I used ados contact adhesive and it eventually split and faded badly in sunlight. Is the iron on less likely to split do you think?
I'm no expert at wood finishing but I think that may be because of the finish used on your wood. Did you seal it with anything? poly? wax/oil?

If there was a problem with the application method you'd probably encounter the veneer lifting and peeling off entirely from the cabinet. It doesn't seem to me that the method of applying the veneer would have much affect on the appearance of the veneer after it has been used. That's what I think anyway.

Anyone care to enlighten us?
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Old 2nd June 2008, 07:23 PM   #27
JLC7 is offline JLC7  United States
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Well they say a picture is worth a thousand words. A video must be worth...

1000 words per frame * 30 frames per second = 30000 words per second and that doesn't include the words you get for sound.

I just uploaded two videos on youtube regarding veneering.

One shows me ironing on a loose sheet of veneer to the point where it's stuck on. You'll see me whack it a bit at the end. If you turn the volume up enough, you can hear the pop and crack sounds the veneer makes as it's heated but not yet stuck. When the noise stops the veneer is mostly on and you'll just have to go back and spot work the edges.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qI2wWSZ8UW8

Here's one that shows you how veneer feels and handles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uk7tEkWEd0I
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Old 5th June 2008, 08:03 PM   #28
JLC7 is offline JLC7  United States
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Routed out the holes in one of the test cabinets using my jasper jig.

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I cut 99% of the thickness of the mdf, sliced around with my blade, and then punched the piece in. Great stress relief. You know, punching innocent defenseless mdf circles. No guilt either.

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Voila! Micket Mouse ears for my tweeter terminals. I just take a 1/2" straight bit on my router and plunge down. You can eyeball the location and mark it with a pencil. Works well enough.



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A little taste of what's to come.

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The holes were all slightly small for some reason so the port wouldn't fit at first. The jig was probably slightly misaligned or maybe the surface was raised when I drilled the pilot hole causing everything to be tilted inwards. I used the 1/2" rabbeting bit and that fixed it up nicely.

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Which brings me to my essential must have router bits to get the neatest router work. From left to right: 1" straight trim bit, 1" flush trim bit, 1/4" straight, 1/2" straight, and 1/2" adjustable rabbet. Optional bits in my opinion are 1/2"-3/4" roundover and a 45 degree chamfer.

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No I'm not that bad. I didn't make the mickey ears for the tweeter terminals yet.

Next up, drilling holes for the speaker terminals. No I lied again, it's time for lunch.
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Old 5th June 2008, 08:57 PM   #29
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That router looks like a very useful tool.

I just use a jigsaw and cut out circles very carefully.
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Old 6th June 2008, 06:58 PM   #30
y8s is offline y8s  United States
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no need to quote all of his pictures...
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