Creating odd angle bevels - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 1st May 2008, 09:49 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Default Creating odd angle bevels

I'm trying to work out how to create a 17 degree angle bevel on butt jointed MDF for a speaker build. The attached image (this posting) (not to scale) shows what I mean.

The angle is required because one side of the cabinet will be sloped (17 degrees).

I have a plunge router, jigsaw, circular saw.

I had an idea to construct the top, right side and bottom (which are all at 90 degrees) with the top and bottom cut to length such that 17 degrees would result if you drew line between corners (see 2nd posting). I could then temporarily clamp a front baffle (and back) then router along the edge of the MDF, directly down on the edge as shown. I would then repeat the process when the side piece is attached from the top to trim down the side piece edge protruding out the top.

My only concern with the above approach is tearing out the MDF. The other possibility is to make a sort of bevel jig for the router but I can't find any plans (let alone how to accurately calibrate it for a 17 degree angle cut with a flush trim bit).

Any help appreciated. (or link to a woodworking site for newbies).

Thanks,
David.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bevel.jpg (8.4 KB, 161 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st May 2008, 09:50 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
as per my post above
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bevel3.jpg (9.1 KB, 149 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st May 2008, 10:21 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Table saw would be my method, but you could try the circular saw with a sawboard. The two angles seem like they'd be the same.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st May 2008, 10:36 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
RobWells's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: UK
Easiest way is to take a piece of mdf to your nearest woodworking shop - even try local schools / colllege and get them to table saw the angle down a long piece. Then you can cut all the other edges square with your circular saw.

Rob.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st May 2008, 10:46 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
RobWells's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: UK
Or try building a saw board to get the angle, In the rubbish drawing I've attatched the yellow bit is your circular saw, the red bit is a couple of bits of ply spaced at 1 join to give the right angle.

Hope its clear enough

Rob
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bevel.jpg (11.5 KB, 142 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st May 2008, 11:15 PM   #6
diyAudio Moderator
 
pinkmouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chatham, England
Or you could use a hand plane. Much less noisy.
__________________
Rick: Oh Cliff / Sometimes it must be difficult not to feel as if / You really are a cliff / when fascists keep trying to push you over it! / Are they the lemmings / Or are you, Cliff? / Or are you Cliff?
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st May 2008, 11:46 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Thanks guys for the effort you've gone to - esp. Rob.

I thought about a fence/guide and running the circular saw along it. My circular saw is basic but allows the baseplate to be pivoted for an angle cut. I would do both top andbottom pieces at the same time sandwhiched together to ensure the angle is the same. The problem I have is in setting an accurate 17 degree angle on the baseplate.

The table saw is a good idea. The local timber yard will pre-cut the pieces and if they can get the angle +/- 1 degree and sandwhich both top and bottom pieces and cut at same time (guaranteeing the angle will be the same) - then a 1 degre variance would equate to only +/- 16mm difference in length of the bottom piece (considering I am building a 960mm high cabinet).

I can get them to oversize the bottom piece so that I can flush trim 16mm+ down with the router.

Thanks,
David.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd May 2008, 01:30 AM   #8
HiSPL is offline HiSPL  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: College Station, TX
The easiest way is to set a 17 degree angle on your table saw and cut all the angled pieces at the same time.

If you have trouble setting your saw you could eyeball it and cut a piece of scrap which you can then lay a protractor on, then adjust your saw accordingly. Cut scrap, adjust. Cut scrap, adjust. Etc, until you get it perfect.
__________________
Hey, do you hear that?
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Right angle DIM socket adaptor jetbat Parts 0 16th February 2009 01:46 AM
Potentiometer Angle hernanstafe Parts 2 15th March 2007 08:38 AM
Angle cut TL -can't find info mashaffer Multi-Way 2 28th July 2006 12:14 PM
Right-angle PCB RCA Socket? Arius Parts 0 2nd September 2005 09:10 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:08 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2