Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 18th April 2008, 02:33 AM   #11
diyAudio Member
 
ShinOBIWAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: UK
Quote:
Originally posted by lepomis
Oh, I misunderstood. You would not need the feather boards with a heavy box.

This is a picture of feathers boards used with a table saw.

featherboards
Interesting, I'm looking at the picture but still can't figure out what they do! Anyone want to throw me a bone?
__________________
The more you know who you are and what you want, the less things will ever be the same.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 02:41 AM   #12
Account disabled at member's request
 
MJL21193's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
They hold the work tight against the fence.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 02:44 AM   #13
tade is offline tade  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Ralieigh nc
Send a message via AIM to tade
and prevent backlash!
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 02:47 AM   #14
Coulomb is offline Coulomb  England
diyAudio Member
 
Coulomb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Ancaster, Ontario
Technically its called kickback.
__________________
I like to stay current!
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 03:30 AM   #15
diyAudio Member
 
ShinOBIWAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: UK
Quote:
Originally posted by MJL21193
They hold the work tight against the fence.
And all becomes clear.

I can see why they aren't really practical for cabinets or larger pieces.
__________________
The more you know who you are and what you want, the less things will ever be the same.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 04:51 AM   #16
GDJ is offline GDJ  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
GDJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, CANADA
Small cuts, don't rush, and be gentle.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 04:58 AM   #17
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Utah
Shin,

I think you can do it by hand if you understand how the cutting forces work and how to reduce them.

The magnitude of the cutting forces are effected by mostly three things. The depth of cut, the hardness of the material, and how much of the cutting edge is engaged with the material.

By taking small depth passes you will be reducing two of these three things. I would start with no more than .100 of an inch depth the first pass and as you go down and more of the cutting edge arc is engaged with the wood, work towards shallower cuts each time. By the time you are down near the proper depth you should be taking no more than about .030 inch depth of cuts.

Make sure the box is very well clamped down and the vibrations are damped. Any movement at the cutting edge will grab and increase the cutting forces. You might try placing small bags of sand on top of the panel you are cutting leaving only enough room to get the router in.

You should also conventional mill instead of climb milling to keep forces at a minimum. If the rotating blade is pulling itself into the material then you are climb milling. This should be avoided unless you have a more rigid setup. This means that if you are pulling the router on one side of the box to make the proper cut you will either have to push it on the opposite side cut or move to the other side of the box and pull it towards you.

  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 11:07 AM   #18
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cheshire
Hi

I use the exact same bits (from Axminster right?) Perform Ovolo 3/4" radius was the largest roundover that I could find in a 1/2" shank.

I have used these by hand on Baltic Birch with no problem. You can do it in one pass (with a reasonably powerful router) but it is better to do it in two. The easiest way, I found, was to use a champfer bit first.

The overall diameter is too large for my machine also, so I have to use it with the wooden baseplate that I made to make the circular cuts required for driver flush mounting.

This is a piece of 10mm Ply bolted to the base of the router instead of the plastic one supplied. The bolts have to be countersunk, and it needs to be nice and smooth/slippy. I found a piece lying around that had been painted with a few layers of housepaint, which worked well.

OT: When using this baseplate to cut circles, I drill small holes at the required distances from the edge of the router bit and bang in a pin (I use the shaft off a rivet) to act as a central axis - you will, of course, also need a slightly larger hole drilled in the speaker baffle. The pin should be tight in the router baseplate and just turnable in the baffle. Very simple, but don't forget to test and measure first.

Doesn't fit
Click the image to open in full size.

Much better
Click the image to open in full size.
N.B. This photo was for example purposes only. I had not removed the original faceplate, or bolted the ply piece to the router. You can see the countersinks though.

Detail
Click the image to open in full size.
Please do not remind me that the bearing screw is missing. It is being used for another job.

Results
Click the image to open in full size.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 12:33 PM   #19
diyAudio Member
 
R-Carpenter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard
Router bits of this size usually have speed limitation. I would guess, that bit should not be run faster then 12 000 rpm. It is very unlikely that if you exceed the speed, carbide will fly off but high speed may actually destroy bearings in your router. 3Hp variable speed router is highly recommended. A 1.5 hp router will not have enough power and will cause chatter marks.
Porter Cable and Bosh are the only 2 companies that I've used. Both have over 3hp model that retail close to $400 US. Bosh is not recommended for router table. Due to the construction, they don't last very long. Porter Cable is like AK 47. Will run in dirt, dust, upside down and sideways. Both have removable plates. I usually use my own plates anyhow.
Best way would be to run it in the shaper if possible.
As mentioned before, multiple passes are recommended. You can start with increments but as you get closer to the radius, the amount of removed material is increasing so the depth of passes should decrease. For a clean result, final pass should be almost nothing.
Earmuffs or plugs if you like this hobby and want to keep on hearing things.
__________________
http://www.diy-ny.com/
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th April 2008, 02:34 PM   #20
diyAudio Member
 
ShinOBIWAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: UK
Some excellent advice here, thanks for sharing.

Dublin:
Those bits do look remarkably similar, if not identical. However I couldn't find any reasonably priced 1" or 1-1/2" radius bits from UK sources, Trend was one of the few that I saw and they were asking a whopping 130 for a single bit. I know from experience with my little Trend box set that these are great cutters but 130 is silly money. In the end I bought from the States who really are spoiled for choice when it comes to serious equipment like this. The UK->US exchange rate is also favourable at the moment. I ordered a 3/4", 1" and 1-1/2" bits at a total cost of 53 including postage.

Seller is here for those interested:
http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQdfspZ32Q...2ia3QQsbrsrtZd

I also like the idea you've had of tackling the baseplate fouling problem. I'll certainly give that a go.

R-Carpenter:
I have a few routers, most of them are cheap rubbish that I bought just to save swapping the bits around. I think when your dealing with the regular sized 1/4" shank bits then a cheap 800w is enough and the cutter quality itself becomes the determining factor.

The best quality 1/2" shank router I have is a 1850w Makita 3612CX:

http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id=22630
__________________
The more you know who you are and what you want, the less things will ever be the same.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
need to discharge psu safely Aidan135711 Tubes / Valves 6 8th March 2008 10:03 PM
how much capacitance can i add safely? Clipped Car Audio 8 28th September 2007 10:40 PM
router bits for flush mounting eisenhower Multi-Way 12 27th December 2006 01:24 PM
Heads UP. Super deal on router bits! rcavictim Equipment & Tools 7 26th September 2006 03:17 PM
VRDS-10. how do I get to the laser to clean it safely??? flipflip Digital Source 8 3rd August 2004 05:36 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:49 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2