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Old 2nd September 2012, 08:57 PM   #1651
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I have just come across this fascinating thread.165 pages!!! I apologise if this has been mentioned already, but it is an interesting idea to try if you have a room big enough (I haven't). It was an idea of a writer for audio magazines called Jimmy Hughe. I have heard his system and all I can say is that this idea works, although I know that 95% of people reading this will say that it can't work, and won't try it. He turned his speakers which were about two feet from the rear wall round so that they were pointing away from the listener, toed in so that the sound off the rear wall was directed towards the llistener. As I say you need a reasonably sized room and an uncluttered wall behind. I seem to remember that he discovered this by accident.
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Old 3rd September 2012, 07:31 AM   #1652
el`Ol is offline el`Ol  Germany
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Didn't Amar Bose invent that?
I once tried it and fount the sound too "psycho". But that's a matter of taste.
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Old 3rd September 2012, 07:59 AM   #1653
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I find your description of "psycho" difficult to equate with the sound from Jimmy Hughes' system. What I found was that
a) the treble was still there (I assumed it would be lost)
b) the stereo image was improved
c) when the speakers were returned to their normal orientation the sound had a glare to it, not noticeable before.
Did the Bose speakers have no direct sound?
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Old 3rd September 2012, 08:24 AM   #1654
graaf is offline graaf  Poland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midrange View Post
Did the Bose speakers have no direct sound?
of course they have

Quote:
Originally Posted by el`Ol View Post
Didn't Amar Bose invent that?
Bose direct/reflecting is an entirely different thing, with purely pseudoscientific, quite absurd "theory" behind it
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Old 3rd September 2012, 10:06 AM   #1655
Elias is offline Elias  Finland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midrange View Post
I have just come across this fascinating thread.165 pages!!! I apologise if this has been mentioned already, but it is an interesting idea to try if you have a room big enough (I haven't). It was an idea of a writer for audio magazines called Jimmy Hughe. I have heard his system and all I can say is that this idea works, although I know that 95% of people reading this will say that it can't work, and won't try it. He turned his speakers which were about two feet from the rear wall round so that they were pointing away from the listener, toed in so that the sound off the rear wall was directed towards the llistener. As I say you need a reasonably sized room and an uncluttered wall behind. I seem to remember that he discovered this by accident.
In that experiment the speaker's stereo triangle locations remained unchanged and they were only rotated ?

I think better is to put the speakers close to each others (touching) in the center and facing towards side walls. This is a fine concept. If you like what you hear then you might find interest of integrating 3 speakers in one and use a linear matrix decoder to generate L-C-R stereo field in the room


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Old 3rd September 2012, 10:59 AM   #1656
Colin is offline Colin  United Kingdom
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From memory, Jimmy Hughes's loudspeaker system was one of the Impulse designs, which featured a horn operating from 400Hz up. I built a similar DIY version from Wireless World some years ago which had the same mid-treble horn design.

The horn was quite directional so I can see that reflecting from rear walls would spread the sound somewhat. I'm not sure how applicable this technique would be to more conventional designs.

FWIW, I found the Wireless World design gave good stereo over a broad area without the need to have it facing away, although I never had them in a large enough room to try the Hughes trick.
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Old 3rd September 2012, 12:03 PM   #1657
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Yes absolutely right, they were (and I think still are) Impulse H1s. I have tried this with a conventional design for a few minutes, and it seemed to be a benefit. If I had a room suitable to try it out, I would give it another go.

On the subject of ideas from the 70s does anyone remember an Alison? speaker that was a conventional shaped box, with which was mounted flush with the rear wall. It had the tweeter centrally mounted on the front face (baffle) and the bass/midrange mounted on the top? face right up against the wall (pointing upwards). The principle I think was that that both drivers effectively had wall loading. I have tried to find out about these and cannot find any reference to them. Have I got false memory syndrome?
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Old 3rd September 2012, 02:45 PM   #1658
Pano is online now Pano  United States
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How big a room did Jimmy Hughes do his rear facing speakers in?
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Old 3rd September 2012, 03:15 PM   #1659
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His room is very unusual. From memory, I would say it was about 15 ft wide (his walls are completely lined with cds; he used to do cd crits), and the room is about 30ft long on 2 levels. The speakers are on the lower level, and are near the side walls and about 2-4ft from the rear wall. He listens on an upper level about 4 or 5 steps up. The rear wall has a large window, and is flat. He has some pretty classy equipment. He was still doing equipment reviews for Hi Fi magazines until recently.
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Old 3rd September 2012, 04:04 PM   #1660
Pano is online now Pano  United States
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Thanks for the info!

I could try that trick with my Altec A5s, I guess. Might be fun. But they are heavy and hard to move.
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