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Old 21st March 2008, 02:58 AM   #1
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Default How do I protect tweeters?

I have Yamaha NS-1000Ms. They were in storage for 20+ years due to toddler frying the tweeters. I have found new tweeters. What can or should I do other than the obvious, to keep from frying them again?
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Old 21st March 2008, 03:07 AM   #2
adason is offline adason  United States
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get much bigger power amp
tweeters burn when low power amp clips
next time you will blow woofers instead
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Old 21st March 2008, 03:27 AM   #3
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Default protecting tweeters

I am using a Nakamichi 620. I t ought to be plenty. My toddler, now 27, was able back then to get the contour control way up, volume up, tuner at a freq. that did not respond with anything but static, and then able to hit the master power. Poof. Or this is what I suspected as that is how I recall finding things when I came home and wifey says baby was bad. That was 25 yrs ago. I do not intend to do any of that but thought there may be some magic box in case I'm drunk.
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Old 21st March 2008, 03:31 AM   #4
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I have not used this circuit, but it seems straightforward enough.
http://sound.westhost.com/project53.htm
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Old 21st March 2008, 08:08 PM   #5
ttruman is offline ttruman  United States
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Hi Fishdaddy,

Glad to hear you found some tweeters for your NS's.

If you can't keep kiddies away from the equipment the simplest solution may be to use a fuse maybe even a breaker. I read somewhere about using a light bulb at the cost of dynamic compression.

I also agree with Adason. If the amp clips the tweeters take a beating. If you like playing loud you will want a couple hundred watts of headroom about the rated 60W of the NS. The popped tweeters I have actually came out of a relatives NS1000 (my NS tweets are just fine). I have an MX 1000-U amp and have seen 300 watt peaks on some classical sources. Good headroom will go a long way towards protecting the tweeters.

You may want to check cross over circuits as well. Make sure the caps are still in tolerance.


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Old 21st March 2008, 09:04 PM   #6
adason is offline adason  United States
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I have seen many old crossovers with light bulbs in the tweeter section. Sansui, Bose...I guess you just need to know what bulbs to use. They should have low resistance at low current/temperature and high resistance at high current/temperature.
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Old 22nd March 2008, 12:48 PM   #7
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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The light bulb trick is an oldie, but a goodie.

Parts Expess has tweeter bulbs, but they look like they are rated much higher than you want.
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Old 22nd March 2008, 09:01 PM   #8
omni is offline omni  United States
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You might try wiring a couple of 9.1 volt zener diodes in series, and then soldering them across the tweeter terminals..........Omni
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Old 22nd March 2008, 11:05 PM   #9
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Protecting against drunks AND toddlers? Sounds like you need to make yourself a power outlet with a key switch. Or a high-mounted shelf.
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Old 24th March 2008, 08:43 PM   #10
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Take this comment with a grain of salt if you wish as the components I'm discussing are 25+ year old and maybe the new stuff is better. I used some Radio Shack "Dynamic Protectors" on a pair of loudspeakers I built in 1986. "Virtually inaudible" , yeah sure. I always thought that the speakers were rather dull on the high end. So when I had to refoam the woofers in 2005 I removed the tweeter protectors. Night and day difference. 19 years of these gizmos messing up my tweeters.

Here is the inside. It is a light bulb and what appears to be either some kind of resistor or slow blow fuse.

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