Maths ....??? - Page 3 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 28th February 2008, 09:58 PM   #21
diyAudio Member
 
Moondog55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Norlane; Geelong: Victoria: Australia
Default Very interesting thread

I am with Bluto, I hated school especially "MATH" and now I find I wish I hadn't.
I will never "understand" in the blaze of light type of knowledge but I get by using tables and programs written by others who have worked harder at it than myself.
But I find the gradual learning process is itself interesting and rewarding, and that is just on more reason to continue this absorbing and at times frustrating hobby/pursuit /addiction.
I am a good tradesman (32 years a chef) this is harder intellectually, and GOOD for me, it keeps me off the streets and out of the pubs, well most of the time.
__________________
QUOTE" The more I know, the more I know, I know (insert maniacal laugh >here<) NOTHING"
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th February 2008, 10:40 PM   #22
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Menlo Park, CA
Quote:
Originally posted by Bluto
[B]Ron E , et al --

'High School Physics and Math'?

Guys .... in 1965 the highest you could take in High School was Geometry!

This is why I asked. I'm amazed at your answers that Calculus and Physics is being taught in High Schools.
I had 27 hours of college credit when I graduated from highschool in 1991 including the first two semesters of physics and calculus I needed for college, plus classes in digital electronics and drafting. As a software guy I managed to avoid analog electronics in engineering school and didn't discover them until I became a recreational tube user.

Probably 5% of my graduating class had the same sort of engineering interests and aptitude.

Quote:
If such is the case why can't anyone under 35 make change for a buck in retail establishments?
I took my math to a career in engineering where the salaries are a lot better than $6 an hour. The youngsters with academic leanings tend (as an exception I've run into PhDs working at my favorite funky hardware store) to use them for more lucrative careers than retail.

Quote:
Why can't young people solve simple equations I do in my head without grabbing a calculator? Is it the same reason I can't understand the formulas?
There are notational and background components that get heavier coverage in text books but have become more accessible to those of us outside academia with the advent of the internet. TI's _Op amps for everyone_ is available online. MIT has their open courseware.

You get out of practice learning too. I've been reading a lot of research papers over the last couple of years, and things like _Paxos made simple_
http://research.microsoft.com/users/...xos-simple.pdf
had me really thinking hard at first.

Quote:
I'm having a hard time even finding what each individual symbol means and each individual symbol represents an entire process and that process combined with the next symbol can cause a number of variations to the next and so on. I likely just made what is easy for most of you to understand sound very difficult.
Math is all about the notation.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th February 2008, 05:27 AM   #23
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Conrad & Ron,

Thanks for the suggestions. They ought to keep me busy through the weekend.

Conrad – I’ll look for the oldies you recommend. For the recent book, did you mean “Introductory Circuit Analysis” by Boylestad?

Ron – I found “Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems” by Close and Frederick at a local library. Is this the seminal book you recommend?

I hope I’m not cutting in on Bluto’s thread, but can anyone recommend a good book on differential equations?

Thanks again,
Looney
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th February 2008, 06:09 AM   #24
Andy G is offline Andy G  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Andy G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Newcastle, Australia
Default Re: Very interesting thread

Quote:
Originally posted by Moondog55

I am a good tradesman (32 years a chef) this is harder intellectually, and GOOD for me, it keeps me off the streets and out of the pubs, well most of the time.
mate, I'd swap a few years of maths to be able to cook up a decent meal .......... any day !!!!
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th February 2008, 06:35 AM   #25
jamikl is offline jamikl  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Melbourne
Thank you for that example Ron E. Helped a lot. I copy and paste all these things into a word file and refer to them when I have more time. I am learning more as I go this way. There a few good sites around that help as well, unfortunately the links to those are on the family pc which I don't get access to very often now. Thanks again,
jamikl
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th February 2008, 10:54 AM   #26
MJK is offline MJK  United States
Account disabled at member's request
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Clifton Park, NY
Quote:
Originally posted by Looneytunes
Ron – I found “Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems” by Close and Frederick at a local library. Is this the seminal book you recommend?
I took a class that sounds exactly like what Ron described as an undergrad at Union in the late 70's, and we used this text.

Dynamics of Physical Systems by Cannon
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th February 2008, 11:22 AM   #27
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Texas
Quote:
Originally posted by Conrad Hoffman
I curse the chowderhead that called that number "imaginary". That description messed me up for years. For the way we use it, there's nothing imaginary about it. Complex is just fine, thank you very much. There has to be a better way to teach math, but "the new math" wasn't it.
Math with application, to me that's how it should be taught. I did all the advanced math classes in school and never knew why I needed it.

Why not teach it while building say, a speaker box, a motor, a program for a video game. Show the kids a practical application and they'll eat it up.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th February 2008, 03:45 PM   #28
Ron E is offline Ron E  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Ron E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA, MN
Quote:
Originally posted by Looneytunes
Ron – I found “Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems” by Close and Frederick at a local library. Is this the seminal book you recommend?

I hope I’m not cutting in on Bluto’s thread, but can anyone recommend a good book on differential equations?

Thanks again,
Looney

If it's red with a picture of the space shuttle on it, that's the one. I am almost positive Close and Frederick is correct even if the cover is different. It's a good book, but I don't have a lot of others to compare with.

For Audio, Beranek's Acoustics is good - but again it has advanced math. Olson's "Dynamic Analogies" is good, but hampered by his use of the CGS system - rather archaic nowadays - but you can find Olson's book free online (out of copyright) if you look hard enough.
__________________
Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works. --Carl Sagan
Armaments, universal debt, and planned obsolescence--those are the three pillars of Western prosperity. —Aldous Huxley
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st March 2008, 08:58 AM   #29
jamikl is offline jamikl  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Melbourne
I agree 100% with Dryseals. In our very young days straight arithmetic was often taught this way, with examples. I would ask the education authorities in almost every country why the practical side was dropped as the maths became more advanced or abstract?
jamikl
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st March 2008, 09:28 AM   #30
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Quote:
Originally posted by Dryseals
Math with application, to me that's how it should be taught. I did all the advanced math classes in school and never knew why I needed it.

Why not teach it while building say, a speaker box, a motor, a program for a video game. Show the kids a practical application and they'll eat it up.
we do.
I take every opportunity during Craft to remind my pupils that the arithmetic we do in woodwork is the application that Maths teaches them HOW TO.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
maths Notagenius The Lounge 0 12th October 2007 08:42 AM
Maths Course mikee55 Multi-Way 8 10th October 2006 09:19 AM
Maths help :( shudster Multi-Way 7 28th January 2006 08:36 PM
T/S + Maths = Help!!! Higo Multi-Way 3 28th August 2003 12:44 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 07:40 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2