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Old 19th February 2008, 08:05 AM   #1
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Default guitar speaker frequency range

Hi all

I've noticed that most brand guitar speakers have a frequency range starting with 80 hz, regardless of the music style the speaker is recommended for (blues, rock, metal...)

Is there a specific reason for that, and I mean other than the fact that most guitar sounds don't require going lower than 80 hz? Is this maybe aimed at avoiding induction of noise from the AC power line (50 or 60 hz depending on where you live)?

The reason I'm asking is that I'm trying to choose between a 12" Celestion G12T-75 having 80-5000 hz frequency range and a 12" AA Craaft 12/250 SD with a 50-5500 hz range... The Craaft has better frequency characteristics (having more lows is usefull for my down tuned playing) and more power, but on the other hand is not specifically designed for guitar as the Celestion is.

So again my questions are:

1. Why guitar speakers frequency range starts at 80 Hz?
2. Is 50/60 hz AC hum avoidance an issue there at all?

Please help!

V.
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Old 19th February 2008, 08:49 AM   #2
hobby1 is offline hobby1  France
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hi,
a guitar speaker don't need to go lower than 80hz since the lower note reproduce by the guitar is 82hz (E string)
and it can help to atenuate the 50/60 hz region
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Old 19th February 2008, 10:29 AM   #3
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Thanks Hobby1

My lowest (6th) guitar string is usually tuned down to D or even C, so maybe I do need the "extra" lower range of the Craaft, but then my concern is the 50/60 hZ region which you mention..... How much of an issue is that when it comes to guitar applications?

Regards! V.
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Old 19th February 2008, 11:37 AM   #4
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally posted by voivodata
Thanks Hobby1

My lowest (6th) guitar string is usually tuned down to D or even C, so maybe I do need the "extra" lower range of the Craaft, but then my concern is the 50/60 hZ region which you mention..... How much of an issue is that when it comes to guitar applications?

Regards! V.
Hi,

The note determines the harmonics spacing, for most guitar amplifiers
on the lowest strings reproducing the fundamentals is not really an
issue. It may be for particular sounds when recording though you
would be getting in the way of the bass most of the time.

Most open backed cabs roll off bass and use highish Qts drivers.
Sealed cabinets are juicier and use lower Qts drivers.

Guitar speakers unsurprisingly generally do a far better job of the
task in hand than general purpose drivers - unless you play jazz.

/sreten.
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Old 19th February 2008, 02:03 PM   #5
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Guitar speakers have specific peaks in the response to emphasize mids or highs and are also usually more efficient than standard speakers. Also, too much low frequency response will create a muddy sound. Guitar speakers have a higher qts to be used in open back cabs. I have experimented with guitar speakers in closed cabs and found that it sucked the life out of them.
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Old 19th February 2008, 02:54 PM   #6
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Keep in mind that the sound reproduction ability doesn't end at the top and bottom of the RATED frequency response. Looking at the frequency response graphs of any speaker will tell you this.

Instead of abruptly ending, the low end starts to slowly roll-off below 80hz, so you are still going to hear plenty of 60hz hum if it is there. And likely, and 60hz hum is going to come from poor shielding in your guitar or amp, meaning it is not originating at the speaker.

Look at these frequency response charts for Eminence Speakers -

Eminence Patriot Ragin Cajun 10" Guitar Speaker
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/docum...660038&index=2

Eminence Patriot Texas Heat 12" Guitar Speaker
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/docum...660031&index=2

I make no recommendations for these speaker, they were simply the first guitar speakers I came across that had frequency response graphs.

I did notice when I searched the internet to see if I could find frequency response graphs on the two speakers that you mentioned, that the 12" AA Craaft 12/250 SD seems to be a very rare speaker. I found hardly any 'hits' on it at all in google. However, the Celestion is a far more popular and readily available, and therefore easier to get repaired or replaced, speaker. I would give some thought to that.

AA Craaft seems to be a German company, and is most search 'hits' were in Netherlands, Germany, and the Czech Republic.

If that scarcity doesn't both you, then go for it.

Keep in mind there are other consideration besides frequency response. How do you plan to apply these speaker; open cabinet or closed cabinet, one speaker or a gang of speakers, replacement in an existing cabinet or in custom built cabinets? These things all matter.

Steve/bluewizard
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Old 19th February 2008, 03:47 PM   #7
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Thank you all for your time!

Here's where I'm at right now:

I still have not decided which speaker to go with. The AA Craaft is indeed made in Germany. Here are some specs for a simular model 12/200 ... http://tigervega.net/Speakers/Craaft%2012-200%20_TC.htm (can't find a freq. response graph though) - this one is still being made . The actual speaker I"m looking at is slightly more powerful, has just a bit wider frequency range, and is very rare, mostly because it is from older AA Craaft production and is considered somewhat vintage....It has very respectable appearance - it just looks like great craftsmanship. The store has only one left and there are no chances for replacement, etc... on the other hand I may end up with rather unique sound if I go with it, as opposed to the widely used celestion...

I spoke today with the salesman and he agreed to have me try the speaker with my equipment --- tube amp, cabinet, , guitar, etc..which suits me well

Thanks again for the replies ...I'll make sure to report on the speaker's sound as soon as I try it..

V.
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Old 27th September 2011, 02:57 PM   #8
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If a guitar speaker frequency range is quoted as starting a 80 Hz then it is probaly down considerably at the frequency of 82 hz (open E string). It is way down if you set your amp volume bassed on the peakes at the higher ranges. If you pick an open A, D, and then E string you will notice that the E string sounds thin. What you are hearing are the harmonics which are at a higher frequency and closer to what the speaker can reproduce and less of the fundamental 82 hz. To better hear what I'm getting at pick the same notes on an acoustic guitar. The E string will sound full and mellow as compared what you hear from the electric guitar. I like Travis type picking and I have been frustrated at the lack of bottom end from my gear. If a guitar is recorded in the studio bypassing the amp then the bottom end will faithfully be reproduced. For this reason I feel that most amps on the market are junk unless you don't need a low end.
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Old 27th September 2011, 04:56 PM   #9
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More than anything bear in mind that the driver like the amp is a part of your instrument!

Guitar speaker drivers are not designed to be flat so you may need to do some experimenting to find the driver that helps you get the sound YOU want.
Best way to narrow down your choices would be to ask guitarists who sound similar to where you want to be.
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Old 27th September 2011, 06:34 PM   #10
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Hi,

Playing live a guitar amp with 80Hz response just gets in the way of the bass.

In a studio its fairly easy to EQ guitar for low bass if that what you want.

Live without a bass, and you want bass, then use a bass guitar amp, as
many did in the valve days, for the extra low down tone, most bass amps
are only flat to 80Hz or so, due to portability/efficiency issues.

rgds, sreten.
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