Building the best loudspeakers - Page 9 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Multi-Way

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 18th February 2008, 01:51 PM   #81
Ceibal is offline Ceibal  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Quote:
Originally posted by Dryseals


I'm just now getting into this thread and it sounds as if you are catching on to what folks are telling you. I started messing with speakers in the later 60's and have heard just about every brand and configurarion out there. I use SE and several other programs when building and then use my own judgement as to configuration. Some times it works, ans sometimes it doesn't. And I still have all the old time measuring gear, scopes signal generators, meters etc. etc.

The specs alone will rarely get you what your hoping for, takes a lot of tweeking and measurement. Many folks have done that for you, take their design and play with it and go from there. I have a whole room full of drivers some old, many new, no two sound alike, even though the specs may be very close and or simular.

Trying to fit the speakers for the box can be a tough one. I live near a little town called Bridge City here in the Republic of Texas. If you are near enough, I can toss together some boxes for you. I have all the needed gear and don't mind, I spend most of my evenings in the shop making saw dust any how.
Your a bit far. I live in Coppell, near Dallas. I have been looking at one of the 1 cubic foot enclosures from Parts Express. That should work with any of the designs that have been recommended for an MTM. I know this is not an exact science and if I decide to put together my own configuration, it probably won't work that great the first time around. Besides, if it was an exact science it wouldn't as much fun to learn. Its all about the challenge.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2008, 02:56 PM   #82
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Texas
Quote:
Originally posted by Ceibal


Your a bit far. I live in Coppell, near Dallas. I have been looking at one of the 1 cubic foot enclosures from Parts Express. That should work with any of the designs that have been recommended for an MTM. I know this is not an exact science and if I decide to put together my own configuration, it probably won't work that great the first time around. Besides, if it was an exact science it wouldn't as much fun to learn. Its all about the challenge.
No problem, just thought I would offer. I'm bouncing back and forth from the shop to the inside today, a tad cool for these old bones, can't wait for the sun to warm things up.

I would like to make one suggestion, if you plan on cutting your own holes, invest in the Jasper Jig and a router, it will save you time, effort and head aches.

Plunge router works best for this type of work. You don't have to buy a high dollar one, I have more routers than most guys have underwear and the elcheapo craftsman that I keep the jig attached to works just as well as the high dollar Freud and Dewalts I have. I could have bought three or four of the Craftsman for the price of some of the others.

Not all router screw holes line up, each is a tad different. The circular based routers seem to fit better. Many of the truncated bases only allow two screws hole to line up.

Pick up a small piece of 3/4" MDF at one of the box stores and take a few practice runs on it. Write down your setting as you do it and re-measure after your cuts and test fit your speakers. You'll only get one shot at the baffle.

The jig is designed to work with a 1/4" bit, but I use anything from a half on down. Just do the math, 1/2" bit is going to cut a hole 1/4" wider than the mark and saves time rather than making multiple passes with a smaller bit.

Suns out, good luck.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2008, 04:46 PM   #83
ScottG is offline ScottG  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: US
Quote:
Originally posted by Dryseals

the elcheapo craftsman that I keep the jig attached to works just as well as the high dollar Freud and Dewalts I have. I could have bought three or four of the Craftsman for the price of some of the others.


..but don't fail to mention that the sentiment expressed here does NOT apply to their other tools. OMG - craftsman table saws are barely adequate for cutting framing lumber.
__________________
perspective is everything
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2008, 08:56 PM   #84
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Texas
Quote:
Originally posted by ScottG



..but don't fail to mention that the sentiment expressed here does NOT apply to their other tools. OMG - craftsman table saws are barely adequate for cutting framing lumber.
Actually Scott, I have a full wood working shop with pretty much any thing a man could want. Right smack dab in the middle is a 80's vintage aluminum topped 10" Crapsman table saw. I put a decent fence on it a few years back and cannot bring myself to buy another table saw. I've ripped 8/4 redoak with it without a hitch.

More often than not blade alignment, blade and the fence are the problems with table saws, after all, it's just spinning a blade. I've looked at some real nice ones, but until it dies on me, I'll just keep buying the other tools. Just bought a Performax 10/20 drum sander last week end, talk about sweet, no more long hours of sanding for this fool.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2008, 10:30 PM   #85
ScottG is offline ScottG  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: US
Quote:
Originally posted by Dryseals


Actually Scott, I have a full wood working shop with pretty much any thing a man could want. Right smack dab in the middle is a 80's vintage aluminum topped 10" Crapsman table saw. I put a decent fence on it a few years back and cannot bring myself to buy another table saw. I've ripped 8/4 redoak with it without a hitch.

More often than not blade alignment, blade and the fence are the problems with table saws, after all, it's just spinning a blade. I've looked at some real nice ones, but until it dies on me, I'll just keep buying the other tools. Just bought a Performax 10/20 drum sander last week end, talk about sweet, no more long hours of sanding for this fool.
Well all I can say is good for you!

I've had one, my father has had one, and even my grandfather has tried them, so throughout a substantial period of time altogether with different models (though all 12") - and not one could hold a blade straight for more than a week even with proper adjustment AND quality stabilizers.

In fact the one I got (for helping to frame my parents house) about 16 years back was easily the worst of the bunch.

A good cast delta with stabilizers and an incra fence - THATS a table saw.

Anyway, as long as you are prepared to foot the bill for bits, even a craftsman router with external speed control and a good table attachment can typically do every thing required for this hobby at an overall lower cost and usually better finish level. Hint, Hint Ceibal.
__________________
perspective is everything
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th February 2008, 01:47 AM   #86
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Texas
Quote:
Originally posted by ScottG


Well all I can say is good for you!

I've had one, my father has had one, and even my grandfather has tried them, so throughout a substantial period of time altogether with different models (though all 12") - and not one could hold a blade straight for more than a week even with proper adjustment AND quality stabilizers.

In fact the one I got (for helping to frame my parents house) about 16 years back was easily the worst of the bunch.

A good cast delta with stabilizers and an incra fence - THATS a table saw.

Anyway, as long as you are prepared to foot the bill for bits, even a craftsman router with external speed control and a good table attachment can typically do every thing required for this hobby at an overall lower cost and usually better finish level. Hint, Hint Ceibal.


Hint, Hint Ceibal, thats where I was aiming. I'm afraid once I do step off into a better table saw I'll be kicking myself for waiting so long. But folks don't need the best to get going. As Clint Eastwood would say, "A man's got to know his limitations" and it's true with tools too.








  Reply With Quote
Old 19th February 2008, 03:34 AM   #87
Ceibal is offline Ceibal  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Quote:
Originally posted by Dryseals




Hint, Hint Ceibal, thats where I was aiming. I'm afraid once I do step off into a better table saw I'll be kicking myself for waiting so long. But folks don't need the best to get going. As Clint Eastwood would say, "A man's got to know his limitations" and it's true with tools too.



Thanks for the recommendation on the router, I was about to ask some of you that question.

The MTM I will (at some point) build looks to be at 4ohm impedence unless I choose different speakers. My reciever is a Denon avr 2000 with 85w accross the front and 25w in the rear. My rear speakers (which will be my dipoles in the near future) are 8ohm and so is my center channel. Given this do you recommend building 4ohms speakers or 8? I have noticed many if not all of the designs are 4ohm that people are building.




  Reply With Quote
Old 19th February 2008, 04:22 AM   #88
Daveis is offline Daveis  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Des Moines, IA
Quote:
Originally posted by ScottG



A good cast delta with stabilizers and an incra fence - THATS a table saw.

Anyway, as long as you are prepared to foot the bill for bits, even a craftsman router with external speed control and a good table attachment can typically do every thing required for this hobby at an overall lower cost and usually better finish level. Hint, Hint Ceibal.
What's this Ceibal you speak of?

Are you talking of using a router and router table as a poor man's table saw?
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th February 2008, 06:21 AM   #89
Bluto is offline Bluto  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: WI.- near the Dells
Daveis -

It's 'Ceibels' thread.

Bluto
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th February 2008, 01:39 AM   #90
Ceibal is offline Ceibal  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Thanks for the recommendation on the router, I was about to ask some of you that question.

The MTM I will (at some point) build looks to be at 4ohm impedence unless I choose different speakers. My reciever is a Denon avr 2000 with 85w accross the front and 25w in the rear. My rear speakers (which will be my dipoles in the near future) are 8ohm and so is my center channel. Given this do you recommend building 4ohms speakers or 8? I have noticed many if not all of the designs are 4ohm that people are building.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
RFT Loudspeakers argonrepublic Multi-Way 3 11th June 2009 03:12 AM
Help needed building loudspeakers sogens Multi-Way 6 5th October 2007 07:11 AM
Building ur own loudspeakers idarwin Multi-Way 26 8th January 2006 09:27 PM
building 5 way outdoors loudspeakers ahdcfegb Multi-Way 1 28th June 2004 02:15 AM
loudspeakers konky Multi-Way 14 14th February 2004 11:22 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:52 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2