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Old 6th February 2003, 01:05 AM   #1
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Default How to finish edges with veneer

The veneering of my last project (Clarro) is very well done but if you look very close and carefully at the edge, you can notice the small line where the veneer stop. If you compare this with a commercial box, this is not as good. My question is how do they finish the edge to look like solid wood? I know in some case they use solid wood for edges but I know they can do a perfect job only with veneer. Even if you look very close, you still think it solid wood.
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Old 6th February 2003, 03:39 AM   #2
Ilianh is offline Ilianh  Canada
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Unless the veneer is slanted by 45 degrees, so joined they make a perfect corner (wich would be... hard)

or they use extremely thin veneer, can't think of anything else.
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Old 6th February 2003, 07:43 AM   #3
UrSv is offline UrSv  Sweden
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Usually that should not be a problem. If you have a thin enough layer of glue and you finish the previous edge perfectly fluch to the edge then you should basically have an invisible joint. At least that's what I get on some of my edges (notice the "some").
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Old 6th February 2003, 11:30 AM   #4
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I did it flush and sanded the corner at 45 degree a bit. Before the stain, the egde was almost invisible. Since the grain of the veneer is different of the grain on "the cut side" the paint is not absorbed in the same way and then you see something. There must be a trick!! This is now my goal [in life] to understand this unless I will never be happy. I know, I am perfectionist.

Ilianh, they use the same standard veneer, 45 degrees cut is possible but very hard to fit.
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Old 6th February 2003, 12:27 PM   #5
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A lot of commercial speakers are made with pre-finished panel goods and are cut with a special machine so the panels can be "folded" into a box. Basically a miter joint, but not usually cut thru. The "V" groove is done from the back side of the panel. Some of what most people think is real veneer is, in actuality, a man-made material (vinyl etc.).

Other than that, 10 mil paper backed veneer makes an invisible edge, as long as the glue line is thin.

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Old 6th February 2003, 01:27 PM   #6
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Default edge veneering

For some speakers my son and I made over the Christmas break we used 45 degree edges for the sides. For the front and backs -- I used the table saw to cut the plywood down to the top veneer level and then fit them in. Thus it was a cut 3/4 inch wide and 11/16th inch deep. You can do this with a good combination blade or a panel cutting blade.

There is only a tiny bit of the edge showing.

You could go one step further and use the same technique to cut a small slice out of the side panels so that the edges perfectly match.

If you do this you should stain the pieces before assembly. If there is any glue runout you're toast.
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Old 6th February 2003, 01:53 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by François
. Since the grain of the veneer is different of the grain on "the cut side" the paint is not absorbed in the same way and then you see something. There must be a trick!! This is now my goal [in life] to understand this unless I will never be happy. I know, I am perfectionist.
Before you stain, apply a coat of sanding sealer, allow to dry, and lightly sand. This will even out the absorbtion, and give a much more even and controlled surface for staining.
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Old 6th February 2003, 04:37 PM   #8
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I did not use wood sealer because it is hardwood. I will give it a try on a dummy box anyway to see if there is an improvement. There is many books on veneering but the problem is to find the right one (especially when you buy from amazon). The forum miss a specialist in cabinet making and finishing
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Old 6th February 2003, 05:10 PM   #9
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Francois

Sanding sealer is always useful, simply because it fills pores in the grain, whatever type of wood you use.

The other method to get an even colour that is used in a manufacturing situation, is to premix your varnish and stain. Again this gives a much more balanced finish, but usually requires a spraying system to give a good result, as well as several test pieces to get the right blend.
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Old 7th February 2003, 12:11 AM   #10
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Yes, I will probably do some testing next week with a sealer...

I tried to take some picture of the edges. This is what you can see at about 5cm.

Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.

If you look at more than 20-30cm, the edges are almost invisible.
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