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Old 7th February 2003, 03:51 AM   #11
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Default sanding sealer

is really useful when you are using a resinous wood like pine
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Old 7th February 2003, 11:56 AM   #12
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Yes.
Normally hardwood does not need to but maybe the veneer is a bit different.
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Old 7th February 2003, 06:40 PM   #13
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Default homestead finishing

I might suggest heading over to homestead finishing and see what they say over there. That would be the home of Jeff Jewitt, one of the top finishers in the industry. He has a web board, and will answer questions. (He also has at least one book on finishing, which I have, and its quite good) His website is: Homestead Finishing

Check him out, it can't hurt!
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Old 7th February 2003, 08:44 PM   #14
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thanks, I will try
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Old 9th February 2003, 04:02 AM   #15
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I did a lot of test today and I found that the different color comes from the paper in the back of the veneer. If you carefully sand the corner to be round, you can get a better result.

I also found a very good book: Veneering A Foundation Course by Mike Burton.
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Old 9th February 2003, 03:42 PM   #16
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The key to clean finish is preparation, and that goes for veneering. When building boxes, or anything for that matter, plumb, level and square will make the next step easier.

Sometimes a small flaw in joinery will cause you to want to sand it (locally) so it's smooth to the touch, but the better way is to deal with the whole surface, keeping the side flat and the edges square and sharp. This might mean filler if it's the substrate for veneer, or sanding the whole surface with a solid block of wood under sandpaper. The edges of the veneer can then be cut with a block plane rather easily, the key is to keep your tools SHARP.

When veneering over rounded corners, it's important (if you have to sand) to keep the curve consistant from end to end so no lumps or dips cause voids in the veneer.

Rockler sells a tool for cutting veneer here:

http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/findpro...er=92825&DID=6

When dealing with hardwoods to be stained, the ideal surface is a cut finish, meaning the planed edge of a board (again, SHARP plane) will look better than a muddy finish that sanding will produce, and a carefully sharpened scraper can give you the look that sanding with progressively finer sandpaper can only approach. You might keep this in mind on small surfaces.

Sanding sealer is a weak finish that will stop stain from penetrating as much as raw wood and will help end-grain from absorbing too much stain and thus becoming darker and more visible. It also has a high solid particulate content to help the final finish lay flatter on coarse woods like oak. It will affect the staining, so I suggest stain test pieces to make sure your final color will be right.

Never mix stain and varnish, or use these one-step finishes, unless it has to be done today... for your ex mother-in-law.

When it comes to applying urethane-type finishes, the first couple coats will provide a protective surface for the wood, but if you want a fine cabinet-grade finish that will act like a magnifying glass for the grain of your nice wood, the key is to get the surface of the finish FLAT.

You need to apply many coats of finish and sand each one with (400 grit or finer) wet-dry sandpaper backed by a wood block in a slurry of mineral spirits. You'll know when you've gotten each coat as flat as you can, when a suction can be felt under the block. You'll know when the finish is complete, the wood will be smiling at you under it's last dried coat.
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Old 10th February 2003, 02:14 AM   #17
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Thanks for your reply. Today I did some other testing by removing the paper in the back of the veneer and I got better results but still not perfect! I will never be happy until I find the way to make a professionnal finish like the commercial loudspeaker. The one that I saw there is no way to see if it is veneer or solid wood but I know it is veneer. The question is still pending
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Old 10th February 2003, 10:11 AM   #18
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Quote:
[i]
You need to apply many coats of finish and sand each one with (400 grit or finer) wet-dry sandpaper backed by a wood block in a slurry of mineral spirits. You'll know when you've gotten each coat as flat as you can, when a suction can be felt under the block. You'll know when the finish is complete, the wood will be smiling at you under it's last dried coat. [/B]
mineral spirits = gasoline (iso-octane)? Why would you want to mess with that rather than plain water?

Anybody know urethane finish brand names in Europe? The only time I have seen this is in a shop for model airplanes.

Puzzled,

Eric
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Old 10th February 2003, 01:03 PM   #19
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Mineral spirits (paint thinner) is very handy to have in the shop. It'll clean up glue deposits on your router bits, before you re-oil the bearings.

Wipe the wood you are about to finish with it, to clean your project before applying more finish.

Gasoline is highly volatile, dirty, smelly, will leave a nasty film on your work, and is dangerous.

Water will raise the grain of any wood it makes contact with, not something you'll want to deal with when finishing, actually its just what you're protecting the wood from.
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